Cambridge Pre-U Drama and Theatre (9801)

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Cambridge Advanced

Version 2

SYLLABUS

Cambridge International Level 3

Pre-U Certiicate in

Drama and Theatre (Principal)

9801

For examination in 2018

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Cambridge International Examinations retains the copyright on all its publications. Registered Centres are permitted to copy material from this booklet for their own internal use. However, we cannot give permission to Centres to photocopy any material that is acknowledged to a third party even for internal use within a Centre.

Support

Cambridge provides a wide range of support for Pre-U syllabuses, which includes recommended resource lists, Teacher Guides and Example Candidate Response booklets. Teachers can access these support materials at Teacher Support http://teachers.cie.org.uk

Changes to the syllabus for 2018

This syllabus has been updated. The latest syllabus is version 2, published September 2017.

The information on page 5 regarding availability for private candidates has been updated. Please see the Cambridge UK Guide to Making Entries for more information.

TQT

We have added guidance on Total Qualiication Time value (TQT). TQT includes both guided learning hours and independent learning activities. The number of hours required to gain the qualiication may vary according to local curricular practice and the learners’ prior experience of the subject.

If there are any further changes to this syllabus, Cambridge will write to Centres to inform them. This syllabus is also on the Cambridge website www.cie.org.uk/cambridgepreu. The version of the syllabus on the website should always be considered as the deinitive version.

Copies of Cambridge Pre-U syllabuses can be downloaded from our website

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Contents

Introduction ... 2

Why choose Cambridge Pre-U? Why choose Cambridge Pre-U Drama and Theatre?

Syllabus aims ... 4

Scheme of assessment ... 5

Assessment objectives ... 6

Relationship between scheme of assessment and assessment objectives ... 7

Grading and reporting ... 8

Grade descriptions ... 9

Description of components ... 10

Component 1: World Drama and Theatre Component 2: Repertoire Component 3: Devised Drama Component 4: Performance Investigation

Marking criteria for Component 2 ... 17

Component 2

Marking criteria for Component 4 ... 23

Component 4 Presentation of Performance Investigation

Procedures for external moderation for Component 2 and Component 4 ... 26

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Introduction

Introduction

Why choose Cambridge Pre-U?

Cambridge Pre-U is designed to equip learners with the skills required to make a success of their studies at university. Schools can choose from a wide range of subjects.

Cambridge Pre-U is built on a core set of educational aims to prepare learners for university admission, and also for success in higher education and beyond:

• to support independent and self-directed learning

• to encourage learners to think laterally, critically and creatively, and to acquire good problem-solving skills

• to promote comprehensive understanding of the subject through depth and rigour.

Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects are linear. A candidate must take all the components together at the end of the course in one examination series. Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects are assessed at the end of a two-year programme of study.

The Cambridge Pre-U nine-point grade set recognises the full range of learner ability.

Total qualiication time

This syllabus has been designed assuming that the total qualiication time per subject will include both guided learning and independent learning activities. The estimated number of guided learning hours for this syllabus is 380 hours over the duration of the course.The total qualiication time for this syllabus has been estimated to be approximately 500 hours per subject over the duration of the course. These values are guidance only. The number of hours required to gain the qualiication may vary according to local curricular practice and the learners’ prior experience of the subject.

Guided learning hours

Cambridge Pre-U syllabuses are designed on the assumption that learners have around 380 guided learning hours per Principal Subject over the duration of the course, but this is for guidance only. The number of hours may vary according to curricular practice and the learners’ prior experience of the subject.

Why choose Cambridge Pre-U Drama and Theatre?

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Introduction

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Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

The course allows for a great deal of lexibility in the selection of content as appropriate to the Centres and the candidates themselves within a context of academic rigour. Centres are able to pace themselves throughout the two years and allow extra-curricular opportunities to be integrated.

Prior learning

Cambridge Pre-U builds on the knowledge, understanding and skills gained by learners achieving a good pass in Level 1/Level 2 qualiications.

Progression

The course will equip candidates with a base of transferrable skills and knowledge suitable for further study at higher-education level while stimulating independent thought and encouraging a love of the theatre and performance arts.

Cambridge Pre-U Diploma

If learners choose, they can combine Cambridge Pre-U qualiications to achieve the Cambridge Pre-U Diploma; this comprises three Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects* together with Global Perspectives and Research (GPR). The Cambridge Pre-U Diploma, therefore, provides the opportunity for interdisciplinary study informed by an international perspective and includes an independent research project.

irst year second year

CAMBRIDGE PRE-U DIPLOMA

Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subject

Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subject*

Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subject*

Global Perspectives Independent Research Report

* Up to two A Levels, Scottish Advanced Highers or IB Diploma programme courses at higher level can be substituted for Principal Subjects.

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Syllabus aims

Syllabus aims

The aims of the syllabus, listed below, are the same for all candidates and are to:

• provide opportunities for learners to develop a range of skills, knowledge and understanding in drama and theatre, embracing creative, interpretative, historical and analytical aspects of the subject.

• provide a context for personal development through serious study of drama and theatre, and thereby promote academic independence and self discipline, broaden intellectual and emotional responses, stimulate critical discrimination and heighten social and cultural awareness.

• provide the basis for an informed and lasting appreciation and enjoyment of drama and theatre, either as participants or informed members of an audience.

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Scheme of assessment

5

Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

Scheme of assessment

For Cambridge Pre-U Drama and Theatre, candidates take all four components.

Component Component

name Duration

Number of marks

Weighting

(%) Type of assessment

Paper 1 World Drama

and Theatre 3 hours 80 40

Written paper, externally set and marked

Paper 2 Repertoire n/a 40 20

Internally assessed and externally moderated

Paper 3 Devised Drama n/a 40 20 Externally assessed at

the Centre by visit

Paper 4 Performance

Investigation n/a 40 20

Internally assessed and externally moderated

Availability

This syllabus is examined in the June examination series.

This syllabus is not available to private candidates.

Combining this with other syllabuses

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Assessment objectives

Assessment objectives

AO1 Communicate knowledge and understanding of the nature and interpretation of

drama and theatre using appropriate vocabulary.

AO2 Demonstrate practical skills in the realisation of repertoire and the creation of original

drama.

AO3

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Relationship between scheme of assessment and assessment objectives

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Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

Relationship between scheme of assessment and

assessment objectives

The approximate weightings allocated to each of the assessment objectives are summarised below. The table shows the assessment objectives (AOs) as a percentage of each component and as a percentage of the overall Cambridge Pre-U Drama and Theatre qualiication.

Component AO1 AO2 AO3 Total

Weighting of component

in overall qualiication

World Drama and

Theatre 56% n/a 44% 100% 40%

Repertoire n/a 100% n/a 100% 20%

Devised Drama n/a 100% n/a 100% 20%

Performance

Investigation 50% n/a 50% 100% 20%

Weighting of AO in

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Grading and reporting

Grading and reporting

Cambridge International Level 3 Pre-U Certiicates (Principal Subjects and Global Perspectives Short Course) are qualiications in their own right. Each individual Principal Subject and Short Course is graded separately on a scale of nine grades: Distinction 1, Distinction 2, Distinction 3, Merit 1, Merit 2, Merit 3, Pass 1, Pass 2 and Pass 3.

Grading Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects and Short Courses

Distinction

1

2

3

Merit

1

2

3

Pass

1

2

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Grade descriptions

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Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

Grade descriptions

The following grade descriptors indicate the level of attainment characteristic of the middle of the given grade. They give a general indication of the required standard at each speciied grade. The descriptors should be interpreted in relation to the content of the syllabus; they are not designed to deine that content.

The grade awarded will depend in practice upon the extent to which the candidate has met the assessment objectives overall. Shortcomings in some aspects of the examination may be balanced by better

performance in others.

Distinction (D2)

• Insightful work that may often be original and employs eloquent expression with assured use of dramatic/theatrical terminology

• Exceptional practical skills in the realisation of repertoire and the creation of original drama

• Sophisticated and well-informed analysis and evaluation of drama and theatre in a variety of contexts demonstrating excellent ability to make independent decisions and judgements.

Merit (M2)

• Proicient work that shows knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre and employs clear expression with mostly appropriate use of dramatic/theatrical terminology

• Proicient practical skills in the realisation of repertoire and the creation of original drama

• Well-developed analysis and evaluation of drama and theatre in a variety of contexts showing ability to make appropriate decisions and judgements.

Pass (P2)

• Generally relevant work that shows knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre, although there may be gaps; backed up by some evidence of understanding of dramatic/theatrical terminology

• Suficient practical skills to realise repertoire and to participate in the creation of original drama • Basic analysis and evaluation of drama and theatre in context; some ability to make decisions and

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Description of components

Description of components

Component 1: World Drama and Theatre

Written paper, externally set and marked. 3 hours.

Section A Unseen (from British Drama since 1956) [30 marks]

Candidates will be given an extract, of no more than 250 lines, taken from an unseen play. Introductory/ contextual notes will also be provided on the question paper. Candidates will be asked questions on speciic aspects of the extract and will be expected to show awareness of historical and theoretical contexts of theatre and drama including the work of salient practitioners.

Examples of areas which may be covered include:

• the use of dramatic forms and concepts to create setting and atmosphere • creation of character and realisation of ideas

• the use of theatrical techniques • the actors’ or director’s viewpoints • the use of modern theatre-technology.

This list is not exhaustive and candidates should be familiar with other dramatic features as appropriate.

In approaching the passage, candidates will be expected to demonstrate understanding of the elements of drama as appropriate to the questions asked, e.g. roles, relationships, dramatic tension, time and place, focus, space, mood, language, symbol, body language, gesture and movement, contrast, dramatic conventions and communication to audience.

Section B Aspects of World Drama and Theatre [50 marks]

Candidates will study two of the four areas of world drama and theatre listed below which are for examination in 2018.

For each of their chosen areas of study, candidates will be expected to study two plays and answer one essay question from a choice of three.

Set plays may not be taken into the examination room.

Examples of areas which may be covered include:

• theatrical traditions and conventions • salient dramatic features and functions

• the social, cultural and political context of plays • directing and production

• communication to audience

• the use of modern theatre-technology.

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Description of components

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Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

Areas of study and set plays for examination in 2018

Foundations of Modern Drama

Anton Chekhov – The Seagull

Henrik Ibsen – Hedda Gabler

George Bernard Shaw – Saint Joan

Oscar Wilde – The Importance of Being Earnest

Political Theatre

Bertolt Brecht – The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui

Caryl Churchill – Cloud Nine

Kee Thuan Chye – 1984 Here and Now

Tony Kushner – Angels in America, Part 1: Millennium Approaches

African Drama

Ama Ata Aidoo – The Dilemma of a Ghost

Athol Fugard – My Children! My Africa!

Percy Mtwa, Mbongeni Ngema and Barney Simon – Woza Albert!

Wole Soyinka – The Lion and the Jewel

Jacobean Tragedy

Thomas Heywood – A Woman Killed with Kindness

Cyril Tourneur (Thomas Middleton) – The Revenger’s Tragedy

John Webster – The Duchess of Mali

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Description of components

Component 2: Repertoire

Internally assessed and externally moderated.

Candidates may prepare their work for this component at any time during the course. The work of

all candidates must be recorded onto DVD ready for external moderation by Cambridge if requested. Candidates should be assessed by their teacher during the live performance/presentation, and not from the recording.

All candidates will offer Part 1 Duologue. In Part 2 they will choose one activity from the list speciied below. Material chosen for both Parts 1 and 2 must be suitable for the audience for which it is intended.

Teachers may not direct the work although they may give guidance on inding suitable pieces of repertoire according to the ability and interests of individual candidates.

Part 1 Duologue [20 marks]

Candidates will perform a duologue for a live audience, lasting between 8 and 10 minutes, and will be assessed on their acting and production skills. The duologue must be taken from a published play, i.e. a play published in printed format. Plays published on the internet are not permitted. Additionally, the chosen play may not be taken from the list of set plays provided in the syllabus for Component 1. Cambridge reserves the right to request a copy of the play for moderation purposes.

Partners are required to be either candidates for Pre-U Drama and Theatre or students from within the Centre. Partners may not be teachers or contacts from outside the Centre.

Candidates must demonstrate:

• a range of emotional states

• character through use of voice, movement, body and space • appropriate costume and setting.

Part 2 Monologue/Design skills [20 marks]

Candidates are required to offer one of the four options listed below. For all options, the chosen play(s) must not be taken from the list of set plays provided in the syllabus for Component 1 and must be from a different play to that chosen for the Duologue in Part 1.

Option 1: Monologue

Candidates will perform two contrasting monologues for a live audience, each lasting between 3 and 5 minutes, and will be assessed on their acting skills. Each monologue must be from the work of a different playwright, and should be contrasting in subject matter, mood and style.

Candidates must demonstrate understanding of how to interpret their chosen texts in performance. In particular they should show character through use of voice, movement, body and space, and develop appropriate rapport with the live audience.

Each monologue must be taken from a published play, i.e. a play published in printed format. Plays

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Description of components

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Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018 Option 2: Set Design

Candidates will make a scale model of a set design for an extract from a published play, which includes one scene change. The play must be from a different period/genre to that chosen for the duologue performed in Part 1.

Candidates must give a presentation based on their scale model. This will explain their vision for the design and its relationship to the chosen extract, and demonstrate an appreciation of the dimensions and possibilities of the performance space.

The presentation can take the form of a talk, a website, a podcast, etc., and must last no more than 10 minutes. Teachers must complete a form to authenticate the work as that of the candidate.

The play must be published in printed format. Plays published on the internet are not permitted. Cambridge reserves the right to request a copy of the play for moderation purposes.

Option 3: Costume Design

Candidates will make a model of one character’s costume, and produce detailed designs for two other costumes, all from the same published play. The play must be from a different period/genre to that chosen for the duologue performed in Part 1.

Candidates must give a presentation based on their model and the other two designs. This will explain their vision for the designs and how they relect the historical and cultural context of the play, and demonstrate an understanding of the technical aspects of the designs.

The presentation can take the form of a talk, a website, a podcast, etc., and must last no more than 10 minutes. Teachers must complete a form to authenticate the work as that of the candidate.

The play must be published in printed format. Plays published on the internet are not permitted. Cambridge reserves the right to request a copy of the play for moderation purposes.

Option 4: Mask Design

Candidates will make a completed mask for one character, and produce detailed designs for two other masks, all from the same published play or chosen tradition. The play/tradition must be from a different

period/genre to that chosen for the duologue performed in Part 1.

Candidates must give a presentation based on their completed mask and the other two designs. This will explain their vision for the designs and how they relect the historical and cultural context of the play/ theatrical event, e.g. pantomime or carnival, and demonstrate an understanding of the technical aspects of the designs.

The presentation can take the form of a talk, a website, a podcast, etc., and must last no more than 10 minutes. Teachers must complete a form to authenticate the work as that of the candidate.

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Description of components

Component 3: Devised Drama

Candidates will be assessed, by a visiting examiner, in a live performance towards the end of the course.

Groups of between three and six candidates will be required to devise and perform in a piece of drama for a live audience based on one of the pre-release stimuli issued by Cambridge at the start of the course. The nature and number of the stimuli may change from year to year. Examples of stimuli include a poem, a picture, a political event, a well-known performer or practitioner.

The piece must last between 15 and 30 minutes depending on the size of the group, e.g. a group of three candidates will produce a piece of 15 minutes’ duration; a group of six candidates, 30 minutes’ duration. It is expected that candidates will take collective responsibility for the directorial concept, script, and costume and set design, although it is recognised that individual candidates are likely to take the lead in different areas depending on their strengths. Teachers may not direct the work although they may give guidance on inding a focus for the piece (based on the chosen stimulus). All devised material must be suitable for the audience for which it is intended.

Centres where there are fewer than three candidates may include a non-assessed actor for the inal performance. However, only those candidates who are being assessed may contribute to the devising/ design process. The non-assessed actor must be a student from within the Centre and may not be a teacher or contact from outside the Centre.

On the day of the visit, each candidate will be awarded two sets of marks: one which will be the same for all members of the company to recognise the concept/vision and realisation of the piece [20 marks], and a further individual mark for each candidate’s performing skills [20 marks].

Before the visit, the Centre will submit a pro forma for each group. This will be completed by the candidates and will give them the opportunity to put forward the points they wish to convey to the Examiner which will assist him/her in the understanding of the performance.

Immediately before the performance, candidates will meet the Examiner informally for a short,

non-assessed discussion. The intention is to allow the Examiner to identify the candidates and to further explore and clarify the concept/vision of the piece he/she is about to watch.

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Description of components

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Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

Component 4: Performance Investigation

Internally assessed and externally moderated.

Candidates will produce an essay of 3000 to 3500 words on a subject of their own choice, although the essay must not be based on any of the set plays listed for Component 1 or any of the plays offered by the candidate in Component 2.

Proposals for areas of study are submitted to Cambridge for approval in advance using the Outline Proposal Form. Centres should submit an Outline Proposal Form for each candidate as this will assist each candidate with their direction of study. Proposals should be not more than 500 words, describing the proposed area of study, title and, where appropriate, list of source material to be consulted.

An Outline Proposal Form is submitted by the Centre to Cambridge after it has been completed by the candidate. Further details can be found in the Cambridge Handbook (UK).

As the investigation involves research and is a preparation for academic study, it will require candidates to follow the conventions of academic writing, including the use of referencing and bibliographies to acknowledge sources where appropriate. These, and quotations, will not count towards the word limit.

The focus of the dissertation/essay should always be a direct engagement with drama and/or theatre

and, throughout, should demonstrate the candidate’s ability in critical thinking. Candidates are therefore expected to evaluate their sources of information, organise, argue and make connections, and base all judgements on dramatic and/or theatrical evidence.

The following are examples of the type of work that may be submitted:

• a playwright’s style and inluence (e.g. Brecht’s Epic theatre)

• dramatic techniques in a non-western tradition (e.g. Asian shadow-puppetry) • detailed dramatic analysis of a play or a signiicant extract

• cultural inluences on a dramatic style or period (e.g. Revenge drama in England in Shakespeare’s time) • a particular work and its impact (e.g. Show Boat and its inluence on Musical Theatre in the 20th century) • a portfolio of theatre reviews focusing on the stylistic intentions of the productions and the audience

reactions (minimum six reviews from three contrasting styles of drama)

• a particular period/movement and its impact (e.g. European Theatre of the Absurd)

• inluence/importance of a particular performer/director/designer/theatre company (e.g. Laurence Olivier/ Vsevolod Meyerhold/Ming Cho Lee/Complicite)

• theatre history and historical performance conditions (e.g. Restoration theatre).

The Performance Investigation must be entirely the candidate’s own work. The teacher will need to assist with inding a focus, wording the title, giving advice on researching the area, and teaching the proper academic conventions for presentation of the essay, but once writing has begun the candidate must complete the process without further assistance. The teacher must not view and comment on drafts.

At the time of submission, the candidate is required to sign a declaration that the Personal Investigation/ Coursework is their own work and the teacher countersigns to conirm they believe the work is that of the candidate. Centres should use the Pre-U Cover Sheet for this purpose. Further details can be found in the

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Description of components

What teachers can do

• Teach appropriate courses from which candidates can choose areas of study.

• Offer detailed guidance on selection of appropriate material and further reading from a wide range of suitable texts.

• Give individual guidance to each candidate on the choice and wording of the Performance Investigation essay title – this will in turn be vetted by Cambridge.

• Give individual guidance on the early resolution of conceptual and practical problems, reminding each student of matters such as structure, balance and the importance of good introductions and conclusions; essay plans in bullet points or lists can be looked at as they do not constitute ‘writing’ (deined as connected prose paragraphs); particular attention can be paid to the sections of the main body of the essay; it is suggested that at least two individual sessions for each candidate are given, with the participation of more than one member of staff.

• Have realistic target dates to keep candidates on course for completion.

• Draw candidates’ attention to the importance of the declaration they will be required to make about the work being their own.

• Feel conident, in the light of these measures, about countersigning candidates’ work.

What teachers cannot do

• Check and correct early versions of the essay.

• Give detailed advice on how to improve the work once writing has begun, either to individuals or groups. • Contribute any writing at all to a candidate’s essay.

Presentation of Performance Investigation

Essays should normally be word-processed.

• Headings, footnotes and bibliography will not count towards the 3000 to 3500 word limit. • The essay must be typewritten on A4-size paper.

• The essay should be attached securely to the coversheet provided. • Every page should bear the candidate’s name and Centre details.

• The essay should not be enclosed in any kind of ile, folder or plastic wallet.

• A complete bibliography of all resources used/referred to must be attached to the work.

• Direct quotations from the work of critics or others must be referenced, giving full details of the source.

Avoidance of plagiarism

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Marking criteria for Component 2

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Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

Marking criteria for Component 2

Component 2

Total 40 marks.

Part 1 Duologue 20 marks

Candidates will perform a duologue for an audience, lasting between 8 and 10 minutes, taken from a published play.

Part 2 Monologue/Design skills 20 marks

Candidates choose one of the options from the list below:

Option 1 Monologue

Candidates will perform two contrasting monologues for a live audience, each lasting between 3 and 5 minutes. Each monologue must be from the work of a different playwright, and should be contrasting in subject matter, mood and style.

Option 2 Set Design

Candidates will make a scale model of a set design for an extract from a published play, which includes one scene change. Candidates must give a presentation based on their scale model to explain their vision for the design, its relationship to the chosen extract and demonstrate an appreciation of the dimensions and performance possibilities of the performance space. The presentation can take the form of a talk, a website, a podcast, etc., and must last no more than 10 minutes.

Option 3 Costume Design

Candidates will make a model of one character’s costume, and produce detailed designs for two other costumes, all from the same published play. Candidates must give a presentation based on their model and the other two designs. This will explain their vision for the designs, how they relect the historical and cultural context of the play and demonstrate an understanding of the technical aspects of the designs. The presentation can take the form of a talk, a website, a podcast, etc., and must last no more than 10 minutes.

Option 4 Mask Design

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Marking criteria for Component 2

Part 1: Duologue

Number of marks

18–20 • A sophisticated interpretation of the playwright’s intentions: a convincing and entirely justiiable setting and sensitive choice of costume.

• A very well-paced and absorbing performance that is completely convincing and communicates clearly and effectively to its audience; excellent and appropriate differentiation in emotional intensity.

• Exceptional level of technique such that the performance appears effortless.

• Complete awareness of the status of the part at all times in relation to the partner.

15–17 • A very good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions, with nuance and detail in selecting setting and costume.

• A well-paced and conident performance that is highly polished and communicates clearly to its audience; clear differentiation in emotional intensity.

• A very good level of technique, strong enough to cover occasional minor slips.

• Mostly aware of the status of the part in relation to the partner.

12–14 • A good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions, covering all essential aspects and selecting appropriate setting and costume.

• A performance with effective pacing that is well-rehearsed and sustains the audience’s interest, although at times more impact is needed; generally assured levels of emotional intensity.

• A proicient level of technique; slips are not obtrusive.

• Often aware of the status of the part in relation to the partner.

9–11 • Many of the playwright’s intentions are realised, usually in a literalistic manner, and the costume and setting neither help nor hinder the performance.

• The performance is mostly well prepared, and allows the audience to follow the action; can handle obvious changes of emotion.

• A variable level of technique; slips are evident but not destabilising.

• Occasionally aware of the status of the part, but seldom able to move the action along.

6–8 • Some of the playwright’s intentions are apparent in the approach, and the costume and setting are broadly appropriate but possibly uninspired.

• The performance demonstrates some preparation and is generally luent; it engages the audience at key moments but there is room for greater differentiation.

• Technique appropriate to much of the piece; there are several moments of uncertainty.

• Often looks to the partner to take the lead.

3–5 • The playwright’s intentions are hindered rather than helped by the approach, and the setting and costume are questionable.

• The performance demonstrates a measure of preparation and there are occasional moments where the audience is engaged, but the pacing is mundane.

• Technical strengths are occasionally apparent but their impact is undermined by the number of slips.

• There is a hint of leadership in the partnership, but there is an overriding sense of dependence on the partner.

1–2 • The playwright’s intentions emerge occasionally through the performance; the choice of costume and setting is simplistic (2) or ill-conceived (1).

• The performance is largely unprepared, or its delivery lacklustre, either of which is frustrating for the audience.

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Marking criteria for Component 2

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Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018 Part 2, Option 1: Monologue

Each monologue should be marked separately out of 20. Add the two marks together and divide by two to give an average mark. Half-marks should be rounded up to the nearest whole number.

Number of marks

18–20 • A sophisticated interpretation of the playwright’s intentions with points of real originality. • A very well-paced and absorbing performance that is completely convincing and communicates

clearly and effectively to its audience; excellent and appropriate differentiation in emotional intensity.

• Exceptional level of technique such that the performance appears effortless.

15–17 • A very good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions with nuance and attention to detail. • A well-paced and conident performance that is highly polished and communicates clearly to its

audience; clear differentiation in emotional intensity.

• A very good level of technique, strong enough to cover occasional minor slips.

12–14 • A good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions, covering all essential aspects.

• A performance with effective pacing that is well-rehearsed and sustains the audience’s interest, although at times more impact is needed; generally assured levels of emotional intensity.

• A proicient level of technique; slips are not obtrusive.

9–11 • Many of the playwright’s intentions are realised, usually in a literalistic manner.

• The performance is mostly well prepared, and allows the audience to follow the action; can handle obvious changes of emotion.

• A variable level of technique; slips are evident but not destabilising.

6–8 • Some of the playwright’s intentions are apparent in the approach.

• The performance demonstrates some preparation and is generally luent; it engages the audience at key moments but there is room for greater differentiation.

• Technique appropriate to much of the piece; there are several moments of uncertainty.

3–5 • The playwright’s intentions are hindered rather than helped by the approach.

• The performance demonstrates a measure of preparation and there are occasional moments where the audience is engaged, but the pacing is mundane.

• Technical strengths are occasionally apparent but their impact is undermined by the number of slips.

1–2 • The playwright’s intentions emerge occasionally through the performance.

• The performance is largely unprepared, or its delivery lacklustre, either of which is frustrating for the audience.

• Technical strengths are greatly outweighed by technical weaknesses.

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Marking criteria for Component 2

Part 2, Option 2: Set Design

Number of marks

18–20 • A sophisticated interpretation of the playwright’s intentions: a convincing and entirely justiiable concept with points of real originality.

• An outstanding realisation of the concept that is entirely suited to its intended performance space.

• Exceptional technical skills entirely appropriate to the realisation of all aspects of the design.

15–17 • A very good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions, with nuance and detail in the overall concept.

• Adept realisation of the concept, very well suited to its intended performance space.

• Very good technical skills, equal to the demands of the piece but with scope for some further reinement.

12–14 • A good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions; the overall concept is appropriate and covers all essential aspects.

• A capable realisation of the concept that is mostly suited to its intended performance space but with some questionable details.

• Technical skills are well suited to the central demands of the work with scope for the development of more advanced skills.

9–11 • Many of the playwright’s intentions are apparent and the concept is broadly appropriate but possibly literalistic/uninspired.

• A balance of strengths and weaknesses in the realisation of the design; generally suited to its intended performance space.

• Suficient technical skills to realise the design in general terms although some aspects need to be further reined.

6–8 • The playwright’s intentions are generally apparent within the concept, but with no attempt at interpretation.

• Uneven realisation that demonstrates a lack of coherence and/or reinement; basic aspects are suited to its intended performance space.

• Some technical skills are evident, but the inal effect appears laboured and possibly messy.

3–5 • The playwright’s intentions are hindered rather than helped by the approach, the concept is awkward, fragmentary or lopsided, and the ideas are confusing.

• Unvarying, perhaps monotonous, realisation of the work which is mostly unsuited to its intended performance space.

• Suficient technical skills to realise some aspects of the design but much is incomplete or ineffectively made.

1–2 • The playwright’s intentions emerge occasionally although the concept is simplistic (2) or ill-conceived (1).

• The realisation is marred by a number of features, all of which reveal insuficient preparation; the design is unsuited to its performance space.

• There are one or two technical strengths, but these are outweighed by the many weaknesses.

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Marking criteria for Component 2

21

Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018 Part 2, Option 3: Costume Design

Number of marks

18–20 • A sophisticated interpretation of the playwright’s intentions: a convincing and entirely justiiable concept with points of real originality.

• An outstanding realisation of the concept that is entirely suited to its intended performance space.

• Exceptional technical skills entirely appropriate to the realisation of all aspects of the design.

15–17 • A very good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions, with nuance and detail in the overall concept.

• Adept realisation of the concept, very well suited to its intended performance space.

• Very good technical skills, equal to the demands of the piece but with scope for some further reinement.

12–14 • A good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions; the overall concept is appropriate and covers all essential aspects.

• A capable realisation of the concept that is mostly suited to its intended performance space but with some questionable details.

• Technical skills are well suited to the central demands of the work with scope for the development of more advanced skills.

9–11 • Many of the playwright’s intentions are apparent and the concept is broadly appropriate but possibly literalistic/uninspired.

• A balance of strengths and weaknesses in the realisation of the design; generally suited to its intended performance space.

• Suficient technical skills to realise the design in general terms although some aspects need to be further reined.

6–8 • The playwright’s intentions are generally apparent within the concept, but with no attempt at interpretation.

• Uneven realisation that demonstrates a lack of coherence and/or reinement; basic aspects are suited to its intended performance space.

• Some technical skills are evident, but the inal effect appears laboured and possibly messy.

3–5 • The playwright’s intentions are hindered rather than helped by the approach, and the concept is awkward, fragmentary or lopsided and the ideas are confusing.

• Unvarying, perhaps monotonous, realisation of the work which is mostly unsuited to its intended performance space.

• Suficient technical skills to realise some aspects of the design but much is incomplete or ineffectively made.

1–2 • The playwright’s intentions emerge occasionally although the concept is simplistic (2) or ill-conceived (1).

• The realisation is marred by a number of features, all of which reveal insuficient preparation; the design is unsuited to its performance space.

• There are one or two technical strengths, but these are outweighed by the many weaknesses.

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Marking criteria for Component 2

Part 1, Option 4: Mask Design

Number of marks

18–20 • A sophisticated interpretation of the playwright’s intentions: a convincing and entirely justiiable concept with points of real originality.

• An outstanding realisation of the concept that is entirely suited to its intended performance space.

• Exceptional technical skills entirely appropriate to the realisation of all aspects of the design.

15–17 • A very good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions, with nuance and detail in the overall concept.

• Adept realisation of the concept, very well suited to its intended performance space.

• Very good technical skills, equal to the demands of the piece but with scope for some further reinement.

12–14 • A good interpretation of the playwright’s intentions; the overall concept is appropriate and covers all essential aspects.

• A capable realisation of the concept that is mostly suited to its intended performance space but with some questionable details.

• Technical skills are well suited to the central demands of the work with scope for the development of more advanced skills.

9–11 • Many of the playwright’s intentions are apparent and the concept is broadly appropriate but possibly literalistic/uninspired.

• A balance of strengths and weaknesses in the realisation of the design; generally suited to its intended performance space.

• Suficient technical skills to realise the design in general terms although some aspects need to be further reined.

6–8 • The playwright’s intentions are generally apparent within the concept, but with no attempt at interpretation.

• Uneven realisation that demonstrates a lack of coherence and/or reinement; basic aspects are suited to its intended performance space.

• Some technical skills are evident, but the inal effect appears laboured and possibly messy.

3–5 • The playwright’s intentions are hindered rather than helped by the approach, and the concept is awkward, fragmentary or lopsided and the ideas are confusing.

• Unvarying, perhaps monotonous, realisation of the work which is mostly unsuited to its intended performance space.

• Suficient technical skills to realise some aspects of the design but much is incomplete or ineffectively made.

1–2 • The playwright’s intentions emerge occasionally although the concept is simplistic (2) or ill-conceived (1).

• The realisation is marred by a number of features, all of which reveal insuficient preparation; the design is unsuited to its performance space.

• There are one or two technical strengths, but these are outweighed by the many weaknesses.

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Marking criteria for Component 4

23

Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

Marking criteria for Component 4

Component 4

Total 40 marks.

AO1 Communicate knowledge and understanding of the nature and interpretation of drama and theatre

using appropriate vocabulary 20 marks

AO3 Analyse and critically evaluate aspects of drama and theatre, making independent decisions and judgements, within appropriate cultural, historical, stylistic and theoretical contexts. 20 marks

Candidates will produce an essay of 3000 to 3500 words on a subject of their own choice, although the essay must not be based on any of the set plays listed for Component 1 or any of the plays offered by the candidate in Component 2.

Examiners will check that approval has been granted for the 500-word proposal for the project, already submitted to Cambridge.

The focus of the essay should always be a direct engagement with drama and/or theatre and,

throughout, should demonstrate the candidate’s ability in critical thinking. Candidates are therefore expected to evaluate their sources of information, organise, argue and make connections, and base all judgements on dramatic and/or theatrical evidence.

Presentation of Performance Investigation

Examiners will take into account the presentation of the candidates, and the extent to which the work follows the following stylistic framework.

• Essays should normally be word-processed.

• Headings, footnotes and bibliography will not count towards the 3000 to 3500 word limit. • The essay must be typewritten on A4-size paper.

• The essay should be attached securely to the coversheet provided. • Every page should bear the candidate’s name and Centre details.

• The essay should not be enclosed in any kind of ile, folder, or plastic wallet.

• A complete bibliography of all resources used/referred to must be attached to the work.

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Marking criteria for Component 4

Number of marks

AO1 Communicate knowledge and understanding of the nature and interpretation of drama and theatre using appropriate vocabulary.

17–20 A sophisticated response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates: • exceptionally insightful work, showing thorough and discriminating knowledge and understanding

of the chosen topic

• eloquent expression with assured and entirely appropriate use of dramatic/theatrical vocabulary

• complex arguments and ideas that are very well developed, succinctly organised and fully coherent.

13–16 A very good, focused response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates:

• very good, thoughtful work, showing well-informed knowledge and understanding of the chosen topic

• luent, concise expression and appropriate use of dramatic/theatrical vocabulary

• some complex arguments and ideas that are well developed, well organised and coherent.

9–12 A good response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates: • proicient work, showing apt knowledge and understanding of the chosen topic

• clear expression and mostly appropriate use of dramatic/theatrical vocabulary

• effective arguments and ideas that are mostly relevant and coherent; reasonably organised.

5–8 An adequate response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates: • adequate work, showing some knowledge and understanding of the chosen topic

• generally clear expression and generally appropriate use of dramatic/theatrical vocabulary

• arguments and ideas are generally relevant but may show inconsistencies; presented within a structured argument.

2–4 A basic response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates: • appropriate, if occasionally limited work, showing basic knowledge and understanding of the

chosen topic

• some clear written expression but with visible limitation; use of dramatic/theatrical vocabulary is evident but may be insecure

• some relevant but basic arguments and ideas within some structure.

1 Some response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates: • some attempt at a response, but work is seriously uneven or simplistic; knowledge and

understanding of the chosen topic is evidently supericial or limited

• limited/incoherent expression and generally inadequate use of dramatic/theatrical vocabulary

• simplistic and undeveloped arguments and ideas with hardly any structure.

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Marking criteria for Component 4

25

Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018 Number

of marks

AO3 Analyse and critically evaluate aspects of drama and theatre, making independent decisions and judgements, within appropriate cultural, historical, stylistic and theoretical contexts.

17–20 A sophisticated response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates: • critical evaluation and analysis that is consistently thoughtful and sophisticated; well-informed

discussion of relevant cultural, historical, stylistic and theoretical contexts

• excellent, reasoned independent decisions and judgements that are very well supported by detailed, pertinent exempliication; comparisons are incisive.

13–16 A very good, focused response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates:

• critical evaluation and analysis that is thoughtful and well-developed; informed consideration of relevant cultural, historical, stylistic and theoretical contexts

• very good, considered decisions and judgements that are well supported by thoughtful exempliication; comparisons are clear and well-judged.

9–12 A good response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates:

• critical evaluation and analysis that is well-developed and shows some apt consideration of relevant cultural, historical, stylistic and theoretical contexts

• good, appropriate decisions and judgements that are supported by exempliication; comparisons are proicient.

5–8 An adequate response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates: • critical evaluation and analysis that is moderate and shows some consideration of relevant cultural,

historical, stylistic and theoretical contexts

• some appropriate decisions and judgements; key points are supported by exempliication; comparisons are competent.

2–4 A basic response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates:

• critical evaluation and analysis that is basic and may be inconsistent or insecure; consideration of relevant cultural, historical, stylistic and theoretical contexts may be insecure or limited

• limited decisions and judgements with limited or patchy exempliication; comparisons are evident but undeveloped.

1 Some response to the question and the investigation topic that typically demonstrates: • critical evaluation and analysis and consideration of relevant cultural, historical, stylistic and

theoretical contexts that is very limited

• decisions and judgements that are undeveloped and simplistic with very little exempliication; comparisons are rudimentary at best.

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Procedures for external moderation for Component 2 and Component 4

Procedures for external moderation for Component 2 and

Component 4

Marks for all candidates for Component 2 and Component 4 should be submitted electronically to Cambridge. The deadline for submission is given in the Cambridge Handbook (UK).

After the marks have been submitted, Cambridge will provide a list of candidates whose work is required for external moderation. The number of candidates in the sample will be as shown in the table below.

Number of candidates entered Number of candidates whose work is required

1–10 all candidates

11–50 10

51–100 15

An additional sample of candidates’ work may subsequently be requested by Cambridge if necessary.

For Component 2, Repertoire, teachers are also required to submit Form 9801/OPTION detailing the option offered by each candidate in Part 2.

Marking, recording and moderation of Component 2

Marking

Teachers must mark the work during the live performance/presentation, and not from the recording. Where there is more than one teacher involved in the internal assessments, the marking must be internally standardised by the Centre (see below).

For each candidate, an Individual Candidate Mark Sheet (9801/ICMS) must be completed giving details of the work submitted and the marks awarded for Part 1 and Part 2.

The teacher’s comments on the Individual Candidate Mark Sheet need to be speciic rather than general.

The information should be detailed enough to justify the mark awarded to a neutral observer not present at the assessment.

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Procedures for external moderation for Component 2 and Component 4

27

Cambridge International Pre-U Drama and Theatre (Principal) 9801. Syllabus for examination in 2018

The DVD recording

(a) Identifying the candidates

• DVDs must be labelled with the Centre name and number and full candidate names and numbers. If a DVD is submitted without a clear label attached it may not be accepted for moderation.

At the beginning of each task, the candidate must identify himself/herself clearly – if necessary removing any mask/costume. It is essential that the Moderator can easily identify the candidates.

(b) Quality of recordings

It is essential to produce clear recorded evidence. In particular:

• Camerawork should ensure that each candidate can be easily identiied and that their performance/ presentation can be clearly seen by the Moderator.

• Extraneous noise and echo must be avoided and the sound track must be clearly audible. • Centres are responsible for checking that all recorded work is clear before submitting it to

Cambridge for moderation. The Centre should re-run any recorded work that does not meet these standards.

Moderation

(a) Internal moderation

If more than one teacher in a Centre is involved in the internal assessments, arrangements must be made within the Centre for all candidates to be assessed to a common standard. The sample the Centre submits to Cambridge should, where possible, include the work of each teacher.

The Centre assessments are then subject to external moderation.

(b) External moderation – what to send to Cambridge

Once Centres have received the list of candidates whose work is required for external moderation, they need to send to Cambridge:

• A completed Individual Candidate Mark Sheet (9801/ICMS) for each candidate. • A DVD cover sheet (9801/DVD).

• A signed print-out of the electronic marks ile submitted to Cambridge.

• The sample of work as speciied by Cambridge. For each candidate in the sample, the DVD recordings of the work for both Part 1 and Part 2 must be sent to Cambridge.

(c) To retain at the Centre

• One complete set of copies of all the forms. • All other recorded work until results are issued.

All records and supporting work should be kept until after the publication of results, and the

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Additional information

Additional information

Equality and inclusion

Cambridge has taken great care in the preparation of this syllabus and related assessment materials to avoid bias of any kind. To comply with the UK Equality Act (2010), Cambridge has designed this qualiication with the aim of avoiding direct and indirect discrimination.

The standard assessment arrangements may present unnecessary barriers for candidates with disabilities or learning dificulties. Arrangements can be put in place for these candidates to enable them to access the assessments and receive recognition of their attainment. Access arrangements will not be agreed if they give candidates an unfair advantage over others or if they compromise the standards being assessed. Candidates who are unable to access the assessment of any component may be eligible to receive an award based on the parts of the assessment they have taken. Information on access arrangements is found in the Cambridge Handbook (UK), for the relevant year, which can be downloaded from the website

www.cie.org.uk/examsoficers

If you are not yet a Cambridge school

Learn about the beneits of becoming a Cambridge school at www.cie.org.uk/startcambridge. Email us at

info@cie.org.uk to ind out how your organisation can register to become a Cambridge school.

Language

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Cambridge International Examinations

1 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB1 2EU, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)1223 553554 Fax: +44 (0)1223 553558 Email: info@cie.org.uk www.cie.org.uk

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