AUTHENTIC AND SIMPLIFIED MATERIALS ON STUDENTS’ WRITING ABILITY OF RECOUNT TEXT

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ABSTRACT

By

Ida Fitri Mardaningsih

Theoretically, writing is one of the important productive skills in English language teaching that must be learnt by the students in the school. To make a good piece of writing, the writer has to pay attention the several aspects including; content, organization, language use, vocabulary, and mechanics. Therefore, the English teachers have to apply the appropriate materials like authentic and simplified materials that they want to explore in writing class, especially about the recount text.

The objective of this research was to find out whether there was difference on writing ability in recount text of the students who were taught by using authentic materials and those who were simplified materials.

This research used quantitative method which had conducted to 32 students in X IPA2 as experimental class 1 and 32 students in X IPA3 as experimental class 2 at Senior High School Negeri 3 Metro. There were two groups of the pre-test and the post-test designs because the researcher investigated the difference on writing ability in recount text of the students who were taught by using authentic materials and those who were simplified materials. The pre-test was conducted in both experimental classes before giving treatment to know the result of students’ basic writing ability. Then, the post-test was conducted in both experimental classes after giving treatment to find out the students’ increase of writing. The data were analyzed by using Independent Group t-test.

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WRITING ABILITY OF RECOUNT TEXT

By

Ida Fitri Mardaningsih

(A Script)

Submitted in a Partial Fulfillment of The Requirements for S-1 Degree

In

The Language and Arts Departments of Teacher Training and Education Faculty

FACULTY OF TEACHER TRAINING AND EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

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CURRIVULUM VITAE

The writer, Ida Fitri Mardaningsih, was born in Metro, on March 30th, 1993. She is the sixth child of Rojiki and Kasri. She has two brothers and three sisters.

The writer started her study from Kinder-garden of PKK Banjarsari in 1999. She studied in elementary school at SDN 1 Metro Utara and graduated in 2005. In the same year, she continued her study at SMPN 6 Metro and graduated in 2008. Then, she entered SMAN 3 Metro and graduated in 2011.

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DEDICATION

This script is dedicated to:

My greatest inspiration, my beloved parents Rojiki and Kasri

My lovely brothers and sisters, Sugihartini, Edi Sutiono, Gunawan,

Wiwik Nur Annisa,and Yeni Nira Yuliana

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MOTTO

Try not to become a person of success, but rather try to become a person of value.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The writer would like to acknowledge her deepest gratitude to the Most Gracious and the Most Merciful, Allah SWT who gives endless bless throughout the writer’s life and also enables the writer to accomplish this script entitled “Authentic and Simplified Materials on Students’ Writing Ability of Recount Text”. It is submitted to fulfill one of the requirements for S1 degree Program at English Education Study Program of Teacher Training and Education Faculty in University of Lampung.

The writer is eager to present her countless gratitude to the people who had supported her throughout her life and especially in finishing this script. Thus, the writer wants to express her sincere respect and gratitude to:

1. The writer’s first advisor, Prof. Dr. Patuan Raja, M. Pd., for his advices, kindness, patience, corrections, supports and valuable advices in helping the writer to improve this script be better.

2. The writer’s second advisor, Dr. Muhammad Sukirlan, M. A., for his advices and suggestions, encouragement, and guidance in finishing this script.

3. Dr. Ari Nurweni, M. A., as the examiner, for this kindness and critical suggestions to the script, thus her contribution had enabled the writer to finish the script rightly.

4. Dr. Mulyanto Widodo, M. Pd., as the Chairperson of Language and Arts Education Department for his contribution and attention.

5. All lecturers of English Education Study Program who have contributed their guidance in accomplishing this script.

6. Mrs. T. Sihombing, S.Pd., the English teacher of SMA Negeri 3 Metro, for her permission to conduct the research in her class and also for her gracious help in finishing this script.

7. The writer’s beloved parents, Rojiki and Kasri, for their endless love, supports and prayers, and encouragements for the writer to accomplish everything in life.

8. The writer’s beloved brothers and sisters Sugihartini, Edi Sutiono, Gunawan, Wiwik Nur Annisa, and Yeni Nira Yuliana, for their loves, laughters, bickers, and supports.

9. The writer’s beloved best friends, Ariyanti Puspita, Helchia Shandra Gusalfandia, Indayani, and Sulistiana, for their generous supports, encouragements, friendship, and amazing experiences of 4 years dedication in English Department. Moreover, the writer’s gratitude to all friends of ED 2011 for the amazing college experiences.

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11. The writer’s brothers and sisters at KKNK-T 2014 at Marang, Luvian, Yoga, Hendika, Taufik, Diah, Oktri, Muji, Dona, and Ima, for the great experiences, adventures, laugh, tears, and beautiful friendship.

Finally, the writer realizes that this script is still far from perfection. Thus, comments, critics, and suggestions will be openly appreciated for the better research. The writer hopes that this research would be a positive contribution to the educational development, the readers, and the other researcher.

Bandar Lampung, Juni 2015

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CONTENTS

2.8. Authentic Materials in Teaching Writing of Recount Text ... 32

2.9. Simplified Materials in Teaching Writing of Recount Text ... 34

2.10. Advantages And Disadvantages Of Authentic Materials ... 35

A. The Advantages of Authentic Materials ... 35

B. The Disadvantages of Authentic Materials ... 36

2.11. Advantages and Disadvantages of Simplified Materials ... 36

A. The Advantages of Simplified Materials ... 36

B. The Disadvantages of Simplified Materials ... 36

2.12. Theoretical Assumption ... 37

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x

3.2. Population and Sample ... 40

3.3. Data Collection Technique ... 41

3.4. Instrument of The Research ... 43

3.4.1. Scoring System ... 43

3.4.2. Scoring Writing Test ... 44

3.5. Validity and Reliability ... 47

3.5.1. Validity ... 47

3.5.2. Reliability ... 48

3.6. Research Procedure ... 50

3.7. Data Analysis ... 52

3.8. Hypothesis Testing ... 52

IV. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS ... 54

4.1. Results ... 54

4.1.1. Implementation of The Experiment ... 55

4.1.2. Result of Pre-Test ... 58

4.1.3. Result of Post-Test ... 61

4.1.4. Normality Test ... 64

4.1.5. Homogeneity Test ... 66

4.1.6. Hypothesis Test ... 66

4.2. Discussions ... 86

V. CONCLUSIONS AND SUGGESSTIONS ... 92

5.1. Conclusions ... 92

5.2. Suggestions ... 93

REFERENCES ... 95

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TABLES

Table 3.1. The Scoring Criteria of Writing Test ... 44

Table 3.2. Specification of Writing Test ... 46

Table 3.3. Reliability Test in Both Experimental Classes ... 49

Table 4.1. Distribution Frequency of Students’ Pre-test Scores in Experimental Class 1 ... 58

Table 4.2. Distribution Frequency of Students’ Pre-test Scores in Experimental Class 2 ... 59

Table 4.3. Analysis of Students’ Pre-test Score in Experimental Class 1 and Experimental Class 2 ... 60

Table 4.4. Distribution Frequency of Students’ Post-test Scores in Experimental Class 1 ... 61

Table 4.5. Distribution Frequency of Students’ Post-test Scores in Experimental Class 2 ... 62

Table 4.6. Analysis of Students’ Post-test Score in Experimental Class 1 and Experimental Class 2 ... 63

Table 4.7. Normality Testing ... 65

Table 4.8. The Increase of Students Test Score in Experimental Class 1 ... 67

Table 4.9. The Increase of Students Test Score in Experimental Class 2 ... 67

Table 4.10.The Analysis of Gain Score in Both Classes ... 68

Table 4.11.The Comparison of Students’ Gain in Both Classes ... 70

Table 4.12.The Analysis of Students’ Writing Ability in Content ... 71

Table 4.13.The Analysis of Students’ Writing Ability in Organization ... 74

Table 4.14.The Analysis of Students’ Writing Ability in Language Use ... 77

Table 4.15.The Analysis of Students’ Writing Ability in Vocabulary ... 80

Table 4.16.The Analysis of Students’ Writing Ability in Mechanics ... 83

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APPENDICES

Appendix

1. Research Schedule ... 100

2. Writing Pre-Test... 101

3. Writing Post-Test ... 102

4. Reliability of the Pre-test in Experimental Class 1 ... 104

5. Reliability of the Post-test in Experimental Class 1 ... 106

6. Reliability of the Pre-test in Experimental Class 2 ... 108

7. Reliability of the Post-test in Experimental Class 2 ... 110

8. Frequencies of Pre-test ... 112

9. Distribution Frequency of Pre-test in Each Aspects of Writing ... 114

10. Frequencies of Post-test ... 129

11. Distribution Frequency of Post-test in Each Aspects of Writing ... 121

12. Normality Test ... 127

13. Homogeneity Test ... 128

14. The Hypothesis Test Result Using SPSS Parametric ... 129

15. Lesson Plan for experimental class 1 ... 131

16. Lesson Plan for experimental class 2 ... 144

17. The Students' Gain Score of Experimental Class 1 ... 157

18. The Students' Gain Score of Experimental Class 2 ... 158

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I. INTRODUCTION

In this chapter, the discussion is concerned on the background, problem, objective, uses, scope, and definitions of terms. They will be discussed in order to provide an insight into research and justify the significance of research.

1.1.Background

Theoretically, writing is one of the important productive skills in English teaching. It is a skill that works as a communication way of the readable text between a writer and a reader. By using this skill, the writers try to present what the idea or the information that they want to share. Mastering writing ability also is compulsory for all of the students that are studying English as a foreign people.

In the classroom context of writing, the students take a role as the composer of the text. It means that they must be able to produce a piece of written work like recount text. The students are expected to pass the final examinations which are related to writing ability. In order to achieve those important goals, the teacher should be successful enough in making the students comprehend the text well.

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useful for the learners because it can stimulate them to be creative people. From writing, the learners can express their idea and feeling. They can write about the unforgettable experience even the phenomena that happened in their environment in the past as recount text.

In order that the students pass the examination, the teachers have to apply the strategy of recount text which includes the appropriate materials and technique of teaching. The teachers have to prepare the materials that they want to explore in the writing class about the recount text effectively. The learning process of writing ability involves the conventional activity in which the students should understand the structure of the text and they make a text individually. The students should be able to express the idea. Then, the teachers check their work one by one. After that, the students get the score from their written work.

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On the other hand, the learning process of writing involves the activity in which the students should understand the structure of the recount text as the simplified materials from the teacher. They are recommended to express the idea in the readable form of text. Then, the teacher should check the students work one by one. Materials from the teacher can help the learners to focus on language learning.

In recent days, the use of authentic materials has become widespread across educational contexts. According to Richards and Renandya (2002), course books fail to address the needs of a specific group of students in many times. In writing ability, the authentic materials are better than the textbooks to the needs of the students. Meanwhile, the textbooks have been designed to facilitate the teacher to give the material for students. For this reason, it encourages the researcher to investigate the students‟ writing ability of a recount text through authentic materials and through simplified materials.

It is assumed that the students perform differently in recount text writing ability of the students who are taught through authentic materials and taught through simplified materials. Therefore, the writer is interested in conducting the research entitled “Authentic and Simplified Materials on Students‟ Writing Ability of Recount Text”.

1.2.Problem

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Is there any difference on writing ability in recount text of the students who are taught through authentic materials and those who are taught through simplified materials?

1.3.Objective

Related to the background stated before, the researcher tries to formulate the objective as follows:

To determine whether there is difference on writing ability in recount text of the students who are taught through authentic materials and those who are taught through simplified materials.

1.4.Uses

This research is hopefully useful for both theoretical and practical use: 1. Theoretically

This research is intended to find out whether there is difference on writing ability in recount text of the students who are taught through authentic materials and those who are taught through simplified materials.

2. Practically

a. As information for all the teacher and students on how authentic materials and simplified materials have the influence on writing ability in recount text of the students.

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1.5.Scope

This research was focused on the increase of students‟ recount text writing ability between those who were taught through authentic materials and taught through simplified materials. The researcher chose the materials from internet. Then, it had been done in SMAN 3 Metro. The researcher used two classes of ten grade students in academic year 2014/2015. The classes were X IPA2 and X IPA3 that had same characteristic in writing ability. Class X.IPA2 became an experimental class 1 and class X.IPA3 as experimental class 2.

The researcher chose recount because it was a text that must be learnt by students at the first grade of Senior High School based on the syllabus. The students were asked to write recount text concerned on the five aspects of writing; content, organization, vocabulary, language use, and mechanics based on the authentic materials in experimental class 1 and simplified materials in experimental class 2. Recount text was a text that had been learned in first semester by the students. Then, the researcher conducted this research in the second semester.

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1.6.Definition of Terms

There are some terms used by the researcher and to make them clear and to avoid misunderstanding, there are clarified as follows:

1. Materials refer to subject matters or knowledge which is significantly used in language learning to affect a decision or action course.

2. Authentic materials refer to the texts written by native English speakers for native English speakers, not for language students. It brings the learners into direct contact in real life and natural communication.

3. Simplified materials refer to the texts adapted by the teacher for a particular aspect focused on what students are learning at the point.

4. Writing refers to the ability of communication that represents language through the inscription of signs and symbols about thoughts or ideas in a readable form.

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II. LITERATURE REVIEW

In this chapter, the literature review for the research is provided. The discussion covers writing, teaching writing, teaching materials, process of teaching, authentic materials, simplified materials, recount text, authentic materials in teaching writing in recount text, simplified materials in teaching writing in recount text, advantages and disadvantages of authentic materials, advantages and disadvantages of simplified materials, theoretical assumption, and hypothesis.

2.1. Writing

Writing is a difficult skill to teach, requiring not only of grammatical devices (dealing with the device used to create writing based on the correct grammar; the set of structural rules that govern the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in language), and the theoretical or cohesive devices used to manipulate the language to effectively transmit the author‟s massage to the reader; such the using of analogy that compares two pairs which have the same relationship, but also of conceptual and judgmental elements (Heaton, 1991: 135).

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1989: 3). Therefore, writing involves rational thinking or commonly called as logic which has a predominant role in it (Hariston, 1986: 5).

To create a good piece of writing that can bring writer‟s idea into reader‟s minds, there are several elements for the writer to pay a close attention to. An effective composition should meet the qualities in some terms proposed by Jacobs et al (1981: 90) below:

1. Content:

The substance of writing, the experience of the main idea, i.e., groups of related statements that a writer presents as unit in developing a subject. Content paragraph do the work of conveying ideas rather than fulfilling special function of transition, restatement, and emphasis.

2. Organization:

It is scarcely more than an attempt to place together all condition of fact and jumble ideas. Even in early drafts it may still be searching for order, trying to make our pattern in its materials and working to bring particulars of its subject in line with what is still only a half-formed notion of purpose.

3. Vocabulary:

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4. Language Use:

The use of correct grammatical form and synthetic pattern of separating, combining, and grouping ideas in words, phrases, clauses, and sentences to bring out logical relationship in paragraph writing.

5. Mechanic:

The use of graphic conventional of the language, i.e., the steps of arranging letters, words paragraphs by using knowledge of structure and some other related to one another.

Meanwhile, Greenlaw (2005) states that there are six elements of good writing as follows:

 Focus. The paper should have a clear point, expressed as a thesis sentence,

early in the paper.

 Organization. The purpose of the paper is to prove its point. To that end,

the paper should be organized as a series of major sub-points which lead logically to the thesis as the conclusion.

 Solid Development. Each of sub-points should be explained in sufficient

detail to convince the reader of their validity.

 Clarity, Concision, Precision. Say what you mean, as clearly and

concisely as possible. Vagueness or ambiguity suggests to the reader that you're not sure what you're writing about.

 Grammatical Correctness/Avoidance of Spelling and Typographical

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or you don't care. Which of those conclusions would you prefer the reader to be left with?

Writing can be seen as a fluency activity, because in writing, someone tries to use cohesive devices, choose various structures to develop meaning, and raises his awareness of parallelism (Hedge, 2000). Writing is also good activity for improving language accuracy. According to Raimes (1983), writing reinforces grammar, structures, idioms, and vocabulary; it is a unique way to improve learning.

According to the definitions stated above, it can be inferred that writing is a complex process about how the writers convey their idea, thought feelings, without ignoring the grammatical rules, spelling and punctuation and using knowledge of the structure and vocabulary to combine the writer‟s ideas as a means of communicative act with an intended purpose. Thus, writing needs the process to make it better.

An effective composition of writing that is required by the students in Senior High School comes from Jacob et al explanation. It is included by the 5 aspect of writing ability such as content, organization, language use, vocabulary, and mechanics that are appropriate to the students‟ level and learning objective.

2.2. Teaching Writing

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through his or her written work, he/she must: 1) have something to say on the same topic; 2) have a point of view and focus; 3) follow accepted conventions format; and 4) be effective.

According to the definitions, it can be concluded that writing is a complex process about how the writer conveys his or her ideas, thought, feelings, without ignoring the grammatical rules, spelling, and punctuations. In addition, the readers receive the meaning or the message from the writer. For many reasons, writing is the most difficult skill to learn. Voss and Keene (1992: 2) write why we should better with writing and purpose for writing as follows:

1. Writing is a way of thinking and learning. Writing gives unique opportunities of explore ideas and enquire information. By writing, we come to know subjects well and make them our own.

2. Writing is a way of discovering. The act of writing allows us to make unexpected connections among ideas and language.

3. Writing creates reading. Writing creates permanent, visible record of our ideas to others to read and ponder. Writing is powerful means of communication for reading information and shapes human thought.

4. Writing ability is needed by educated people. Our writing skill is often considered to reflect our level of education.

Purpose for writing:

 To express yourself

 To provide information for your reader

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Ricahards (2003: 303) states that form those language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) that are taught at schools, writing is the most difficult for teacher and students. The difficulties are in generating and organizing idea as well as translating these ideas into readable text. This opinion is supported by Raimes (2003: 306) who says that learning and teaching language promote anxiety and there is more anxiety when writing is involved. Furthermore, she says that many teachers themselves do not feel comfortable with writing in English even if it is in native language.

Apart from that, Harmer (1998: 112) proposes several reasons why writing should be taught to the students. Some of the reasons of teaching writing are as follows:

1. Reinforcement

Students will benefit greatly from seeing the language written down. The visual demonstration of language construction is invaluable for both the understanding of how it all fits together and as an aid to committing the new language to memory.

2. Language development

The actual process of writing helps students learn as they go along. The mental activity they have to go through in order to construct proper written text is all part of ongoing learning experiences.

3. Learning style

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4. Writing as a skill

Writing is one of the four skills that must be mastered by students of language. Students need to know how to write letters, how to put written reports together, how to replay advertisements, etc. they need to know some of writing‟s special conventions (punctuation, paragraph constructions, spelling, etc).

Based on the explanation about writing, writing is classified as a hard subject. The teacher should have known about the problems in writing that are faced by the students. She or he must have an appropriate way to overcome their problems in writing process. Brown (1987: 7) states that teaching is showing or helping someone how to learn and how to do something providing with knowledge, causing to know or to understand. It means, when the teacher built students‟ self confidence and encourage them to express their idea, thought, and feeling in the form of written language, teaching writing will be effective.

Harmer (2001) sates that there are a number of strategies to encourage students to write, as follows:

1. The way of the teacher gets the students to plan. This stage explains about the way of the teacher encourages the students to think about what they are going to write, what they are going to say, what the purpose of their writing is, and who the audience is.

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3. The way of the teacher responds to the students‟ writing. The teacher reads the students‟ writing and gives suggestion or correction to their writing. It is known as reformulation. Correction and revision on the students‟ writing will help them to improve their writing into well-organized product.

Gardner and Johnson (1997) describe the process approach of writing: Writing is a fluid process created by writers as they work. Accomplished writers move back and forth between the stages of the process, both consciously and unconsciously. Young writers, however, benefit from the structure and security of following the writing process in their writing.

o Prewriting. Students generate ideas for writing: brainstorming; reading

literature; creating life maps, webs, and story charts; developing word banks; deciding on form, audience, voice, and purpose as well as through teacher motivation.

o Rough Draft. Students get their ideas on paper. They write without

concern for conventions. Written work does not have to be neat; it is a 'sloppy copy.'

o Reread. Students proof their own work by reading aloud and reading for

sensibility.

o Share with a Peer Revisor. Students share and make suggestions for

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o Revise. Improve what the narrative says and how it says it: write additions,

imagery, and details. Take out unnecessary work. Use peer suggestions to improve. Clarify.

o Editing. Work together on editing for mechanics and spelling. Make sure

the work is 'goof proof.'

o Final Draft. Students produce their final copy to discuss with the teacher

and write a final draft.

o Publishing. Students publish their written pieces: sending their work to

publishers; reading their finished story aloud, making books.

In actuality, the writing process is not a highly organized linear process, but rather a continual movement between the different steps of the writing model.

Raimes in Reid (1993: 27) states teaching writing is a unique way to reinforce learning. It means teaching writing is very important to build the students‟ language ability. Besides, giving feedback is also important things in procedures of writing. It can reinforce the students to be better in writing.

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2.3. Teaching Materials

Teaching materials are the resources a teacher uses to deliver instruction. Each teacher requires a range of tools to draw upon in order to assist and support student learning. These materials play a large role in making knowledge accessible to a learner and can encourage a student to engage with knowledge in different ways. In the field of education, teaching materials is a commonly used acronym that stands for "teaching/learning materials". Broadly, the term refers to a spectrum of educational materials that teachers use in the classroom to support specific learning objectives, as set out in lesson plans.

A number of learning materials focussing on textbooks and teachers‟ books were implemented (Brumfit, 1980). The materials were purposely based on underlying principles that were very different from those already present in the prevailing education system, in order to encourage change. Teaching materials include handouts, unit outlines, websites, textbooks, visual aids, lecture recordings and any materials which you provide to the students to help them learn.

Teaching material is a generic term used to describe the resources teachers use to deliver instruction. Teaching materials can support the teaching and it can increase students‟ success. Ideally, the teaching materials will be tailored to the content in which they're being used, to the students in whose class they are being used, and the teacher. Teaching materials come in many shapes and sizes, but they all have in common the ability to support student teaching.

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(learning tools or games that students can handle to help them gain and practice facility with new knowledge). Teaching materials are different from teaching “resources”, the latter including more theoretical and intangible elements, such as essays or support from other educators, or places to find teaching materials.

Teaching materials are important because they can significantly increase student achievement by supporting student learning. For example, a worksheet may provide a student with important opportunities to practice a new skill gained in class. This process aids in the learning process by allowing the student to explore the knowledge independently as well as providing repetition. Learning materials, regardless of what kind, all have some function in student learning.

Teaching materials can also add important structure to lesson planning and the delivery of instruction. Particularly in lower grades, teaching materials act as a guide for both the teacher and student. They can provide a valuable routine. For instance, if you are a language arts teacher and you teach new vocabulary words every day, knowing that you have a vocabulary game to provide the students with practice regarding the new words will both take pressure off of you and provide important practice (and fun) for your students.

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all allow you to modify assignments to best activate each individual student's learning style.

In this case, teaching materials is essential for quality of the materials to be made available to the teachers and students in adequate quantities to support the teaching and learning processes.

2.4. Process of Teaching

Teaching is to instruct or train someone, or the profession of someone who teaches. Someone means an instructor who teach for the purposes of the handbook in a class or course. Defining a “good instructor” has proven more elusive, but in The Essence of Good Teaching (1985), psychologist Ericksen wrote “good teachers select and organize worthwhile course material, lead students to encode and integrate this material in memorable form, ensure competence in the procedures and methods of a discipline, sustain intellectual curiosity, and promote how to learn independently.”

Driscoll (2005: 23) defines instruction as “any deliberate arrangement of events to facilitate a learner‟s acquisition of some goal”, and in so doing she shows why there have been no teaching theories since the very beginning of education as a formal process. According to Driscoll‟s definition of teaching, most of the learners do implication of the instruction depends on the learning theory.

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acquired only through long, patient study and diligent practice. The teaching process, on the other hand, can be divided into steps. Although there is disagreement as to the number of steps, examination of the various lists of steps in the teaching process reveals that different authors are saying essentially the same thing: the teaching of new material can be reduced to preparation, presentation, application, and review and evaluation.

o Preparation

For each lesson or instructional period, the instructor must prepare a lesson plan. Traditionally, this plan includes a statement of lesson objectives, the procedures and facilities to be used during the lesson, the specific goals to be attained, and the means to be used for review and evaluation. The instructor should make certain that all necessary supplies, materials, and equipment needed for the lesson are readily available and that the equipment is operating properly. Preparation of the lesson plan may be accomplished after reference to the syllabus or practical test standards (PTS). The instructor can organize the overall instructional plan by writing down the objectives and making certain that they flow in a logical sequence from beginning to end.

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behavior is demonstrated Criteria is a list of standards which measure the accomplishment of the objective. The criteria should be stated so that there is no question whether the objective has been met.

o Presentation

Instructors have several methods of presentation from which to choose. In this handbook, the discussion is limited to the lecture method, the demonstration-performance method, and the guided discussion. The nature of the subject matter and the objective in teaching it normally determine the method of presentation. The learning method is suitable for presenting new material, for summarizing ideas, and for showing relationships between theory and practice.This method is most effective when accompanied by instructional aids and training devices.

Combining the lecture and the demonstration-performance methods would be useful for teaching students to overhaul an engine. The initial information on overhaul procedures would be taught if the classroom using the lecture method, and the actual hands on portion in the shop would use the demonstration-performance method. In the demonstration-demonstration-performance method, the steps must be sequenced in the proper order so the students get a correct picture of each separate process or operation, as well as the overall procedure.

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o Application

Application is where the student uses what the instructor has presented. After a classroom presentation, the student may be asked to explain the new material. The student also may be asked to perform a procedure or operation that has just been demonstrated. For example, after an instructor has demonstrated and explained the use of the flight computer, the student may be asked to use the flight computer to compute groundspeed, drift correction, or time en route. In most instructional situations, the instructor's explanation and demonstration activities are alternated with student performance efforts. The instructor makes a presentation and then asks the student to try the same procedure or operation.

Usually the instructor will have to interrupt the student's efforts for corrections and further demonstrations. This is necessary, because it is very important that each student perform the maneuver or operation the right way the first few times. This is when habits are established. Faulty habits are difficult to correct and must be addressed as soon as possible. Periodic review and evaluation by the instructor is necessary to ensure that the student has not acquired any bad habits.

o Review and Evaluation

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may be formal. More likely, the evaluation will be formal and results recorded to certify the student's progress in the course. In either case, students should be made aware of their progress. Any advances and deficiencies should be noted at the conclusion of the lesson. Failure to make students aware of their progress, or lack of it, may create a barrier that could impede further instruction.

The evaluation of student performance and accomplishment during a lesson should be based on the objectives and goals that were established in the instructor's lesson plan. Review and evaluation allow both the instructor and the students to have a valid picture of where the student stands in respect to the established standard. Review and evaluation in every lesson provides opportunities for both positive feedback and correction of faults.

In short, the process of teaching includes 4 steps. Firstly, the teacher prepare lesson plan based on the learning objective. Secondly, presentation about the materials conducts in the learning process. Next, the learners have to apply the material that they have master in exercise. At the end, the teachers do review the students‟ comprehend and evaluate the students‟ progress.

2.5. Authentic Materials

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important feature of authentic materials are that they are not produced for educational purposes and are rather defined as real life texts (Wallace, 1994: 145). Teachers may incorporate authentic materials not only to motivate the learners but also to give them the feeling that they are using real language- “the target language as it is used by the community that speaks it”. (McNeill, 1994: 130).

According to Martinez (2002), “Authentic would be material designed for native speakers of English that is used in the classroom in a way similar to the one it was designed for”. For example, from a radio news report, the teacher can ask the students to discuss the report on pollution in the city they live. However, Widdowson (1990; cited in Martinez, 2002) differentiates between authentic and genuine materials. Authentic materials are used in their original form as they are not changed, but the genuine materials are basically the authentic materials which are used in a somewhat simplified way and adapted from a class, such as; jumbled paragraphs, cut out headlines etc. (Martinez, 2002).

According to Guariento and Morley (2001) authentic materials can create a bridge between classroom knowledge and a student‟s capacity to participate in the real world events. Besides, a teacher has to “make sure that activities taken from different sources link together to make a cohesive whole, and that they serve to fulfill the aims and objectives of your lesson” (Gower, 1995: 80). Examples of Authentic Materials according to Hedge (2000) are shown as follows:

 Spoken: TV commercials, films, news items, weather forecasts, airport and

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 Written: recipes, articles, train timetables, advertisements, brochures, poems,

application forms, and instruction for use of equipment.

In this case, the example of authentic material in recount text can be taken from diary of Wimpy Kid as follows:

(https://www.mightyape.co.nz/product/Diary-of-a-Wimpy-Kid-The-Third Wheel/20712719/images/14540809)

2.6. Simplified Materials

Simplified materials are the materials used by teachers or learners to facilitate the

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distracting, idiosyncratic styles without suffering a loss of valuable communication features and concepts that are found in authentic text (Allen and Widdowson, 1979). Simplified material can be a valuable aid to learning because it accurately reflects what the reader already knows about language (Davies and Widdowson, 1974) and contains increased redundancy and amplified explanation (Kuo, 1993).

Simplified materials are often criticized as creating unnatural discourse that reduces helpful redundancy and may, in effect, increase the reading difficulty of the text (Crandall, 1995). It depends on noun phrases, avoidance of pronominal reference, and simple syntactic structure, provides a greater amount of co-referentiality. Simplified material appears to show great cohesion. Thus, simplified material provides more redundancy, which, when available from more than one source, assists readers in understanding the message and intention of a text.

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In this case, it can be inferred that simplified materials are the materials which is used for teaching foreign language for one inescapable reason: beginning and intermediate foreign language students need them. Here is the example of recount text as simplified material from the internet.

Visiting Bali

There were so many places to see in Bali that my friend decided to join the tours to see as much as possible. My friend stayed in Kuta on arrival. He spent the first three days swimming and surfing on Kuta beach. He visited some tour agents and selected two tours. The first one was to Singaraja, the second was to Ubud.

On the day of the tour, he was ready. My friend and his group drove on through mountains. Singaraja is a city of about 90 thousands people. It is a busy but quiet town. The street are lined with trees and there are many old Dutch houses. Then they returned very late in the evening to Kuta.

The second tour to Ubud was a very different tour. It was not to see the scenery but to see the art and the craft of the island. The first stop was at Batubulan, a center of stone sculpture. There my friend watched young boys were carving away at big blocks of stone. The next stop was Celuk, a center for silversmiths and goldensmiths. After that he stopped a little while for lunch at Sukawati and on to mass. Mass is a tourist center

My friend ten-day-stay ended very quickly beside his two tour, all his day was spent on the beach. He went sailing or surfboarding every day. He was quiet satisfied.

(https://pakpuguh.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/recount-text/)

2.7. Recount Text

According to Derewianka (2004: 14), a recount is the unfolding of a sequence of events or time. The focus of recount text is to reconstruct past experience on a sequence of events, all of which relate to a particular occasion. Meanwhile, Anderson and Anderson (1997) sates that recount text is a text that tells about something that happened or retells past events or activities and has a purpose to give detailed information about what and when of that events.

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recount text can be concluded as a piece of text reconstruct past events in order which they happened. It relates to a particular occasion.

Macken-Horarik (2002: 22) exemplifies that recount text can be found in personal letters, oral and written histories, police record insurance claims, report of science experiment, and excursion „write-ups‟. More details, Derewianka (1990: 15) categorizes the text of recount into three major types; they are Personal Recount, Factual Recount, and Imaginative Recount, she defines as follow:

1. Personal Recount

Personal recount is retelling an event that the writer was personally involved in. It is usually aimed to entertain and inform the reader. The characteristics of this type are use of first person pronoun (I, we) personal responses to the events can be included, particularly at the end, and details are often chosen to add interest or humor. For example: personal experiences, personal letter, diary, entries, journal, anecdotes, and postcard.

2. Factual Recount

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3. Imaginative Recount

Imaginative or literary recounts entertain the reader by recreating the events of an imaginary world as though they are real such as fiction. It takes on an imaginary role and creates imaginary details bur places them in realistic context. The characteristics of this type are usually written in the first person and it may be appropriate to include personal reaction. For examples: My Life as a Roman Emperor, My Adolescence at The First Year of Junior High School, My Rainforest Adventure, etc.

4. Procedural Recount

Procedural Recount records the steps taken in completing task or procedures. The use of technical terms is accurate time sequence like first, second, next, the, finally, etc. The first person narration (I or we) gives credibility to the information. For examples: include a flow chart of the actions required for making bread and the steps to solve a mathematical problem.

5. Biographical Recount

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From five types of recount text above, the focus of the research is personal recount. It tells the activities or events about the writer‟s experience by herself or himself. The theme that will be used in personal recount such as students‟ experiences especially bad experiences and good experiences. In addition, the personal recount text that is used in this research taken from someone‟s experience and diary‟s native speaker in internet.

The characteristics of recount text can be seen from its social function, generic structure and language features. The social function of recount text is to retell past event or something which happened in the past. The purpose of this text can be only inform or even just to entertain. To achieve that purpose, recount text has set of generic structure. There are three generic structures of recount text, namely, orientation, series of events, and reorientation.

1. Orientation

Orientation is an introduction of events or experiences. The orientation provides all the necessary background information to make sense of the text. It usually uses 5W (who, what, where, when, and why). The author needs to give information about what happened, who or what was involved, when and where the events occurred and why so the readers or audiences understand the text easily.

2. Series of events

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should be encouraged to experiment with arranging events in order of importance. Unity between paragraph is created through the use of time connectors (before, throughout, finally) so that the separate events form part of coherent text.

3. Re-orientation

Re-orientation is stating a personal comment of the writer to the story or concluding the text. In the stage, the writer summarizes the event but it is optional based on the writer. The sequence of events is ended and any issues or problems are completely resolved by character.

Besides generic structure, recount text also uses particular language features. Here are the language features of recount text:

1. Using simple past tense in most recounts. However, present tense may be used in diary or journal. Future tense is sometimes used in conclusion of an imaginative or biographical recount to predict what might happen in the future.

2. Specific descriptive words (adjectives) help the readers visualize or imagine events. For example: the butterfly spread out its limp and wings to dry. In a factual recount or accident report, adjective provide necessary detail for an accurate recount.

3. A range of conjunctions (because, although, and while) are used to link clauses within sentences.

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5. Adverb and adverb of phrases to indicate specific times and places. Examples: yesterday, last week, at home, outside, etc.

6. Specific participant (nouns and pronouns, such as Mr. John, William Wallace) to provide detail and credibility.

7. Use of action verbs to indicate an event or action. Examples: stayed, went, killed, etc.

In order to be clear about recount text, here is the example of recount text and its elements:

Orientation There were so many places to see in Bali that my friend decided to join the tours to see as much as possible. My friend stayed in Kuta on arrival. He spent the first three days swimming and surfing on Kuta beach. He visited some tour agents and selected two tours. The first one was to Singaraja, the second was to Ubud.

Event 1 On the day of the tour, he was ready. My friend and his group drove on through mountains. Singaraja is a city of about 90 thousands people. It is a busy but quiet town. The street are lined with trees and there are many old Dutch houses. Then they returned very late in the evening to Kuta.

Event 2 The second tour to Ubud was a very different tour. It was not to see the scenery but to see the art and the craft of the island. The first stop was at Batubulan, a center of stone sculpture. There my friend watched young boys were carving away at big blocks of stone. The next stop was Celuk, a center for silversmiths and goldensmiths. After that he stopped a little while for lunch at Sukawati and on to mass. Mass is a tourist center.

Re-orientation My friend ten-day-stay ended very quickly beside his two tours, all his day was spent on the beach. He went sailing or surfboarding every day. He was quiet satisfied.

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recount text is appropriate text to be taught to the students because the topics of this text can make the students interesting in process of teaching learning.

2.8. Authentic Materials in Teaching Writing of Recount Text

Authentic materials are the materials that have not been produced for the purpose of language teaching. Hadley (2001: 190) writes that “simulated authentic” (materials pedagogically derived or created with the intent of providing realistic situations of communication) and “unmodified authentic” (communicative

material not specifically designed for language learning purposes) are both of use in aiding student comprehension. The teachers can use the authentic materials in classroom. For the example, the teacher uses the model of recount text from native speaker‟s diary and journal in internet. The language that used in diary will be real language that native speaker use in daily life. It is more useful to the students to concern using real language.

The characterization goes one step further than the Longman Dictionary of Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics, for it suggests that the “qualities of

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within the recount text in ways which are likely to be shared with fluent users of the language.

The authentic materials can carry out the students to be creative in share their idea in writing recount text. The writers create their texts with the assumption that the reader will have some form of knowledge of the text, and also with an ideal reader in mind (Mangubhai, 2006). Besides, they will be interested in the material because it has many varieties of text form. It uses the real language in communication conducted by the native speaker. So, the students do adaptation in the actual social activity and situation.

The task of writing in recount text has to authenticity reflects the purpose to which language input as material. It means that the chosen tasks should involve the learners not only in authentic communication with recount text in the classroom, but also in learning and the purpose of learning. It is claimed that texts which are recognisable to students in terms of content, form and culture, can help them overcome any writing ability difficulties they may encounter with less common vocabulary, and with words specific only to the subject presented (Carrell and Eisterhold, 1987).

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2.9. Simplified Materials in Teaching Writing of Recount Text

Simplified materials are the materials used by teachers or learners to facilitate the learning of a language. The teacher usually uses the material of teaching from handbook based on syllabus. Especially in recount text, the students can use the example of text from book. The text includes the example of structure which is studied in the classroom.

Simplified materials are justified, poorly written, uninteresting, and hard to read, and lack normal text features such as redundancy and cohesion. Widdowson (1978) states that simplified materials version has less proficient for language learner because there is more limited words and structures used to rewrite or adapt the original text. The writer makes a list of vocabulary and structures when working a recount text. Simplified materials as a second language text may be primarily written or adapted in terms of a linguistic formula based on list of word and grammar patterns that learners are expected to know.

In writing, grammatical structure and vocabulary are the important aspects that can be evaluated directly. Writing an original text from outline for the language learners has been termed a simple original by Hill and Thomas (1988: 44). The simplified material in recount text that included in students‟ handbook is concern on clear grammar points and general vocabulary. The text is not really difficult, so the students can understand the message easily.

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material is relevant to the students‟ ability. That is way the objective of the learning process can be reach effectively.

Simplified texts pay less attention to the essence of writing: communicating with an audience. This has led to the well-justified consensus that simplified material is not normal discourse (text written for communication). However, one strength of simplified materials is they have the best material for teaching beginning and intermediate students how to write the text. They are at the right linguistic level. In addition, simplified materials are short, and the beginning levels have illustrations as an aid in comprehension. Simplified materials can help the beginner students‟ comprehension in understanding the recount text.

2.10. Advantages and Disadvantages of Authentic Materials

In using authentic materials, there must be strengths and weakness that will be elaborated in following section.

A. The Advantages of Authentic Materials

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B. The Disadvantages of Authentic Materials

There are two weaknesses when presenting authentic materials in the class. First, authentic materials often contains difficult language, difficult vocabulary items and complex language structures, which causes a burden for the teacher in lower-level classes and low level students. Too many structures are mixed so lower levels have a hard time decoding the texts. Hence, it can be

frustrating when used with less proficient learners. Besides that, the use of authentic materials takes so much time for the teachers and the learners. The special preparation is needed to collect the materials.

2.11. Advantages and Disadvantages of Simplified Materials

In using simplified material, there must be strengths and weakness that will be elaborated in following section.

A. The Advantages of Simplified Materials

The simplified materials have two big advantages in language learning. Firstly, the language used in simplified materials has clear objective to develop the students‟ comprehension and students‟ need in mastering material. The materials are also relevant, useful and adapted for a particular aspect focused on what students are learning at the point. Secondly, they contain well formed sentences all the time. In writing, they are useful for teaching grammar.

B. The Disadvantages of Simplified Materials

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dialogues, and other aspects of content tend to be specially written to incorporate teaching points and are often not representative of real language use. They often present an idealized view of the world or fail to present real issues. The second is the materials are presented generally, it means that they may not reflect the interests and needs of students.

2.12. Theoretical Assumption

Referring to the literature reviews, the researcher supposes that the students‟ writing ability in recount text should be integrated with the using of effective materials. A good material can make the students have good ability in writing recount text. Then they understand about the structure and context of the text. So, the students will be easy to practice language skill in writing recount text.

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On the other hand, simplified materials focus on the clear grammar and structure at the point. Besides, the vocabulary that is used in simplified text is familiar for the students. So, they can easily understand about the text. Therefore, the researcher assumes that the students whose authentic materials treatment and those whose simplified materials treatment will perform the recount text writing differently in terms of five aspects of writing including content, organization, language use, vocabulary and mechanics.

2.13. Hypothesis

The hypothesis of this research can be stated below:

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III. METHODS

In this chapter, the methods of the research will be discussed. The part of methods such as: research design; population and sample; data collection technique; instrument of the research; scoring system; scoring writing test; validity and reliability; research procedure; data analysis; and hypothesis testing will be explained further.

3.1. Research Design

The research was conducted to find out whether there was different students‟ writing ability of recount text who were taught by using authentic materials and simplified materials. The researcher chose two groups or classes for conducting the research. Both classes were experimental classes. The students were given by treatment of teaching writing of recount text. One class used authentic materials and another class used simplified materials. After giving the treatment, the researcher gave a post test for both classes.

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writing ability. In addition, the post-test was conducted in both experimental classes after giving treatment to find out the students‟ increase of writing.

The research design was illustrated as follow: G1 T1 X1 T2

G2 T1 X2 T2

In which,

G1 : the experimental class 1 where authentic material was applied G2 : the experimental class 2 where simplified material was applied T1 : pre test

T2 : post test

X1 : the treatment of authentic materials

X2 : the treatment of simplified materials

(Hatch and Farhady, 1982: 22)

3.2. Population and Sample

The research was conducted at the first year of SMAN 3 Metro. There were two classes that were taken as the sample of the research. Those classes were X IPA2 that consists of 32 students and X IPA3 consists of 32 students. The total number of sample was 64 students. They relatively had the same characteristics according to their ability in score of assignment.

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writing of recount text through authentic materials in the experimental class 1. Besides, the researcher taught writing of recount text through simplified materials in the experimental class 2. Then, the students in both classes did the pre-test and the post-test of writing recount text.

3.3. Data Collection Technique

In collecting the data, the researcher used the following technique:

1. Administering Pre-test

Pre-test was administered by using written test to both classes (experimental class 1 and experimental class 2) at the beginning of the research. It was given before the treatment in order to know how far the competences of the student in recount text writing. By giving the pre-test, the researcher knew some problems of the students in writing. The students were asked to compose recount text based on the theme “good or bad experience”. The instruction asked them to write 4 paragraph of recount text including one paragraph of orientation, 2 paragraphs of series of events, and one re-orientation in 2x45 minutes. In addition, this pre-test was carried out to find out the basic writing ability of experimental class 1 and experimental class 2 in recount text.

2. Treatment

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modeling and reinforcing, planning, introducing independent construction, and revising. The researcher used two lesson plans to be applied in two experimental classes based on authentic materials in experimental class 1 and simplified materials in experimental class 2. The researcher took 3 meetings in each experimental class while one meeting had been conducted in 2x45 minutes. The materials in experimental class 1 are Diary of a Wimpky Kid at School, Meet Asia-the second of growing line up of diary and Diary of native speaker. Besides, A Beautiful Day at Jogja, My amazing vacation, and My Horrible Experience are the materials that the researcher used in experimental class 2.

3. Administering Post-test

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same topic of the experience with the previous test (pre-test). Time allocation for the post-test is 2x45 minutes.

3.4. Instrument of the Research

The researcher checked the students‟ recount text writing by giving two writing tests of recount text to the students in essay form. The writing tests were the pre-test and post pre-test. The aim of the pre-pre-test was to know the students‟ basic writing ability in recount text before conducting the treatment. Meanwhile, the aim of the post test was to know the students‟ increase of writing ability in recount text after conducting the treatment. The researcher gave instructions to the students to write their name and class in a piece of paper. Then, the researcher gave the time to do the writing test at around 90 minutes. The topics of the instruments were two recount texts based on authentic materials and simplified materials.

3.4.1.Scoring System

The researcher listed the scores and calculated the means through mean formula as follows:

X =

Where:

X : mean

X : total scores

N : number of students

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the score for the students. A mean of 90 means that the test is easy while an average of 40 means that the test is difficult. According to Heaton (1991: 175), the mean score of any test is arithmetical average i.e. the sum of the separate scores is divided by the total number of students. It is the most efficient measure of central tendency, but it is not always appropriate.

3.4.2. Scoring Writing Test

To gain the data in this research, the researcher considered based on the following components below:

1. Content : the substance of writing, the idea expressed (unity) 2. Language Use : the employment of grammatical forms and syntactic

patterns

3. Organization : the form of the content (coherence)

4. Vocabulary : the selection of word that suitable with the content 5. Mechanics : the conventional devices used to clarify the meaning

(Jacobs et al, 1981)

The system of scoring criteria basically covers five aspects of scoring system in writing and it is elaborated as the explanation at the table below:

Table 3.1. The Scoring Criteria of Writing Test

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appropriately.

(Georgia High School Writing Test: Scoring Rubric)

Table 3.2. Specification of Writing Test

Writing Aspects

Criteria in writing test Score

Content Make an effective recount text by seeing the topic sentence and

controlling the idea 20%

Language Use Use past tense, correct grammatical and syntactic pattern 20% Organization Use the transitional word in spatial order 20% Vocabulary Use the suitable words 20% Mechanics Use correct graphic conventional of the language. Including

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researcher easy for analyze the increase of the aspect writing of the students in experimental class 1 and experimental class 2.

3.5. Validity and Reliability

In order to get the data which were needed by the research, the researcher tried to use an appropriate instrument to measure the result of the research. This research had valid and reliable instrument of writing test. Here, the researcher gave a brief explanation about validity and reliability.

3.5.1. Validity

Validity is the extent to which it measures what it is supposed to measure. Hatch and Farhady (1982: 250) also explain that validity refers to the extent to which an instrument really measures the objective to be measured and suitable with the criteria. A test must aim to provide a true measure of a particular skill which it is intended to measure. Thus, to know whether the test has good validity, the researcher looks from the content and construct validity.

- Content validity

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the social function of the text, structure of the text, and the elements of the correct linguistic and appropriate to the context‟.

- Construct validity

Construct validity concerns whether the tests are true reflection of the theory of the trait – in our case – language which is being measured. To find construct validity of the test, the researcher formulated the test by the concept of writing ability. In this case, the focus of the test includes the content, grammar, organization, vocabulary and mechanics of writing recount text by Jacobs et al (1981: 90).

According to the explanation above, it can be concluded that the writing test that was used by the researcher in experimental 1 and experimental 2 was valid because the materials had complete the requirements of content and construct validity.

3.5.2. Reliability

Reliability is defined as the extent to which a questionnaire, test, observation or any measurement procedure produces the same results on giving repeated test. It is the stability or consistency of scores overtime or across raters. The researcher used two raters in scoring the students‟ writing test of recount text.

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SMA Negeri 3 Metro for 29 years. Each rater would provide a performance score for each individual (e.g., a total score summed over open-ended test items). The correlation between the scores was assigned by Rater 1 and by Rater 2 to persons could be used to determine inter-rater reliability. It means that the consistency among raters (in the sense of relative or deviation scores assigned).

The formula is as follows:

r = 1

Where:

r : rank – difference

d : the sum of difference between each pairs of ranks

N : number of students

(Harris, 1974: 142)

In this case, the researcher also uses the standard of reliability (Arikunto, 1998: 260) below:

0.81 – 1.0 = very high 0.61 – 0.8 = high 0.41 – 0.6 = medium 0.21 – 0.4 = low 0 – 0.2 = very low

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Table 3.1. Reliability Test in Both Experimental Classes

Pre-test Post-test Criteria Experimental Class 1 0.70 0.79

High reliability Experimental Class 2 0.68 0.79

From the criteria of reliability and calculation, it can be concluded that the reliability of two raters in the two experimental classes is high. It means that the researcher‟s way of scoring the data is similar to the second rater. They had almost the same scoring system. The raters used the scoring rubric and scoring criteria of writing. The result showed that both raters showed that both raters scored the students‟ writing consistently and fairly.

3.6. Research Procedure

The procedure of this research was designed as follows:

1. Determining the population and then selecting the sample

The population of this research was the first grade of SMAN 3 Metro. The samples were chosen by cluster sampling. The researcher took two classes. Those two classes were randomly assigned into experimental class 1 and experimental class 2.

2. Arranging the materials to be taught

Figur

TABLES ..........................................................................................................
TABLES . View in document p.11
Table 3.1. The Scoring Criteria of Writing Test
Table 3 1 The Scoring Criteria of Writing Test . View in document p.58
Table 3.2. Specification of Writing Test
Table 3 2 Specification of Writing Test . View in document p.60
Table 3.1. Reliability Test in Both Experimental Classes
Table 3 1 Reliability Test in Both Experimental Classes . View in document p.64

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