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STRATEGIC PLAN

OF THE MINISTRY OF FORESTRY

2005-2009

(REVISED)

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Published by :

Centre of Forestry Planning and Statistics Forestry Planning Agency

Manggala Wanabakti Building, Block VII, 5 Floor; Jl. Gatot Subroto Jakarta, 10270

Phone/Fax: +62 21 5720216

© The Ministry of Forestry of Indonesia 2006

ISBN: 979-25-3102-5

Edited by:

Tonny R. Soehartono Chaerudin Mangkudisastra Agus Nurhayat

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Indonesian forest resources, which function as one of the components of the life support system,

constitute a trust from God for the people of Indonesia to be wisely managed so that they can

provide optimal and sustainable benefits. Up to now, Indonesian forest resources have

provided benefits as one of the main financing modes of national economic development, in the

form of economic growth, labour absorption and regional development.

The commitment to manage forest resources is already in effect and aims toward forest

preservation and sustainable development. In fact at this time, however, there are still

weaknesses in management that are causing a decline in quantity and quality of forest

resources, which at last are causing the appearance of environmental damages, economic losses,

and social impacts at a very worrying level.

It is recognized that there is a diversity of desires, goals, and interests to various parties,

including local, national and even global communities, for the benefits of forest resources. The

solution for overcoming the issues above will be based on agreement by concerned forest sector

stakeholders, based on equity and justice, as well as highlighting proposed management

principles and existing values.

Starting now, the Indonesian nation had determined to make every effort to manage forest

sustainability, prioritizing in the short run the protection and rehabilitation of forest resources

for the greatest possible prosperity and justice for people.

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MINISTER OF FORESTRY OF THE REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA

REGULATION OF THE MINISTER OF FORESTRY Number : P.58/Menhut-II/2006

Concerning

STRATEGIC PLAN OF THE MINISTRY OF FORESTRY 2005-2009

MINISTER OF FORESTRY,

Consider : a. that, the Strategic Plan of The Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009 has

decided by Ministry of Forestry Regulation No.: P.04/Menhut-II/2005, dated 14 February 2005;

b. that, based on the analysis result of target of the strategic plan which conducted by each echelon I of the Ministry of Forestry, therefore its recommended to revise the Strategic Plan the Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009;

c. that, due to the circumstance above, revision of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009 is necessary to decide into a Regulation of the Minister of Forestry.

Refer to : 1. Act Number 5 of 1990 concerning Conservation of Natural Resources

and its Ecosystems;

2. Act Number 24 of 1992 concerning Spatial Planning;

3. Act Number 23 of 1997 concerning Environmental Management;

4. Act Number 41 of 1999 concerning Forestry;

5. Act Number 25 of 2004 concerning National Development Planning

System;

6. Act Number 32 of 2004 concerning Local Government;

7. Government Regulation Number 25 of 2000 concerning Authority of

Government and Authority of Provinces as Autonomous Territories;

8. Government Regulation Number 34 of 2000 concerning Forest Administration, Forest Management Planning, Forest Utilization, and Forest Land-Use for Non-Forestry Purposes;

9. Government Regulation Number 20 of 2004 concerning Government

Work Plan;

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11. Presidential Decision Number 187/M of 2004 concerning Development of the Indonesian United Cabinet;

12. Presidential Regulation Number 7/M of 2005 concerning National

Mid-term Development Plan 2004-2009;

13. Presidential Instruction Number 7 of 1999 concerning Performance Accountability of Government Institutions;

14. Presidential Instruction Number 9 of 2000 concerning Gender Equality in the National Development;

15. Minister of Forestry Decision Number SK456/ Menhut-VII/2004 concerning Five Priority Policies on Forestry in the National Development Program of the Indonesia United Cabinet;

16. Minister of Forestry Regulation Number P. 27/Menhut-II/2006 concerning Long-term Forestry Development Plan 2026-2025;

17. Minister of Forestry Regulation Number P.28/Menhut-II/2006 concerning Forestry Planning System;

18. Decision of Head of National Administration Institute, Number 239/IX/8/2003 concerning Revised of the Guideline for Arranging Report of Performance Accountability of Government Institutions.

DECIDES to stipulate :

FIRST : To validate revision of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009, as annexed to this regulation,

SECOND : Revision of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009 is arranged as a reference for :

a. Development of Strategic Plans of Echelon I/II Units and Technical Implementing Units of the Ministry of Forestry;

b. Development of Work Plan of the Ministry of Forestry, and Work Plans of each institutions within the Ministry of Forestry;

c. Development of Sub-National Forestry Development Plans;

d. Coordination of inter sectors planning, and between Central and Sub-National Forestry Institutions (Provinces and Districts);

e. Control of development activities under the Ministry of Forestry.

THIRD : To instruct Echelon I and II in the Ministry of Forestry to:

a. Elaborate Revised of the Strategic Plan of Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009 into Strategic Plans of their respective units;

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Issued in : JAKARTA

On : August 30, 2006

Declaring that this copy MINISTER OF FORESTRY

complies with the original, Director of Legal and

Organisational Affairs, Signed

Signed

SUPARNO, SH H.M.S. KABAN, SE., M.Si.

Personnel No. 080068472

Cc:

1. Coordinating Minister for Economic Affairs 2. Minister of Finance

3. Executive Official of National Audit Agency

4. State Minister of National Development Planning/Head of National Development Planning Board

5. All Governors in Indonesia

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REGULATION OF MINISTER OF FORESTRY NUMBER : P.58/Menhut-II/2006

DATE : August 30, 2006

SRATEGIC PLAN

OF THE MINISTRY OF FORESTRY

2005-2009 (

REVISED

)

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Entering second year implementation of national developments, forestry sector as alike the others is facing many significant changing on Indonesia and global situation development, such as the increasing of oil price, internal rate, and the fluctuating of currency change. The other thing are economic disparity among region, and excess budget due to several natural disasters such as earth quake, flooding, tsunami that affect significantly to the target achievement on economic growth in the sector, regional, and national level.

Such conditions above leads the Ministry of Forestry reviewed its strategic planning which has been legalized by Ministry of Forestry Regulation No.: P.04/Menhut-II/2005, dated 14 February 2005.

The revision of the strategic planning 2005-2009 has been established through participative process, transparent, and has been consulted public within internal Ministry of Forestry and others stake holders. This revised version is not change all the content, but merely in the achievement target and the improvement of the strategic action to achieve them.

This document will be used as guidance for the Ministry of Forestry and related institution in implementing their development and administrations to fulfill people welfare and sustainable forest development for the period of 2005-2009.

The Minister of Forestry of Indonesia

Signed.

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PREFACE ... ... i

LIST OF CONTENT ... ii

LIST OF FIGURE ... iii

LIST OF APPENDIX ... iv

I. INTRODUCTION ... 1

A. Background... 1

B. Aim and Objectives ... 2

C. Scope ... 2

D. Revised Process Of The Strategic Plan ………. 2

E. Conceptional Flow Chart ... 3

F. Output ... 3

II. VISION AND MISSION ... 5

A. Vision ... 5

B. Mission ... 5

III. PRESENT CONDITION ... 6

A. Environment ... 6

B. Social ... 8

C. Economic ... 8

D. Institution………. 12

IV. EXPECTED CONDITION ………. 14

A. Improvement of people-living quality and welfare ……… 14

B. Improvement of community access ……….. 14

C. Forestry Governance ……… 15

D. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of forestry ………. 16

V. PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION ... 17

VI. ANALYSIS AND ASSUMUPTION ... 18

A.. Identification of Strengthen, Weakness, Challenges, and Opportunities ……….. 18

B. Analysis ... 19

C. Assumption ………. 22

VII. POLICY, PROGRAM AND MAIN ACTIVITY ………. 23

A. Policy ………... 23

B. Program ………... 23

C. Main Activity ……… 24

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1. Contribution of forestry sector to the National GDP ……… 1

2. Conceptional flow chart ……… 3

3. Forest fire ………. 6

4. Critical land ……….. 7

5. Graphical trends of conservation area ……….. 7

6. Realization of log production ……… 9

7. Trends of forestry non-tax income ……… 9

8. Trends of forest utilization license ……… 10

9. Non-wood forest production (Rattan) ……….. 10

10. Rehabilitation ……… 11

11. Progress of industrial forest plantation ………. 11

12. Organization structure of the Ministry of Forestry ……… 12

13. Education background of staff of the Ministry of Forestry ……… 13

14. Age of staff of the Ministry of Forestry ………. 13

15. Career level of staff of the Ministry of Forestry ………. 13

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1. Matrix of Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009 (revised) …. 26 2. Matrix of target estimation of Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry

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Figure 1. Contribution of the Forestry Sector to the National GDP

CHAPTER 1.

INTRODUCTION

A. BACKGROUND

Indonesia is one of the countries with the largest tropical forest after Brazil and Zaire. Indonesia own forest area about 126.8 million hectares which is known as world lung and climate balanced. Indonesia tropical forest is also known as the second rank of biodiversity after Columbia which should be kept properly.

Within the last three decade, forest resources in Indonesia act as one of main element of Indonesia economy which contributes to national revenue, job opportunity and regional development, and economic improvement. BPS (2000) show that national revenue from forestry sector in the sixth Five Years plan (1992-1997) reached US$ 16.0 billion or 3.5% of National GDP (figure 1).

Forest sector contribution in 2004 was increase by 4.17%. This improvement is in line with the increasing of forest utilization and the development of forest product industries (timber and non timber). The utilization of timber in 2004 was IDR 21,716.60 million, while non timber forest products were IDR 31,382.00 million. Total contribution of forestry sector in 2004 about IDR 53,098.60 million, it’s increase IDR 2,065.10 million than 2003 (BPS 2004).

Ministry of Forestry makes some efforts to improve forestry development in Indonesia, by setting several programs such as combating illegal logging and it’s associated trade, forest fire prevention, forestry sector restructuring, rehabilitation and conservation forest resources, and forestry decentralization. Those programs have been implemented in the short and long term planning of the Ministry of Forestry.

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PREFACE ... ... i

LIST OF CONTENT ... ii

LIST OF FIGURE ... iii

LIST OF APPENDIX ... iv

I. INTRODUCTION ... 1

A. Background... 1

B. Aim and Objectives ... 2

C. Scope ... 2

D. Revised Process Of The Strategic Plan ………. 2

E. Conceptional Flow Chart ... 3

F. Output ... 3

II. VISION AND MISSION ... 5

A. Vision ... 5

B. Mission ... 5

III. PRESENT CONDITION ... 6

A. Environment ... 6

B. Social ... 8

C. Economic ... 8

D. Institution………. 12

IV. EXPECTED CONDITION ………. 14

A. Improvement of people-living quality and welfare ……… 14

B. Improvement of community access ……….. 14

C. Forestry Governance ……… 15

D. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of forestry ………. 16

V. PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION ... 17

VI. ANALYSIS AND ASSUMUPTION ... 18

A.. Identification of Strengthen, Weakness, Challenges, and Opportunities ……….. 18

B. Analysis ... 19

C. Assumption ………. 22

VII. POLICY, PROGRAM AND MAIN ACTIVITY ………. 23

A. Policy ………... 23

B. Program ………... 23

C. Main Activity ……… 24

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1. Contribution of forestry sector to the National GDP ……… 1

2. Conceptional flow chart ……… 3

3. Forest fire ………. 6

4. Critical land ……….. 7

5. Graphical trends of conservation area ……….. 7

6. Realization of log production ……… 9

7. Trends of forestry non-tax income ……… 9

8. Trends of forest utilization license ……… 10

9. Non-wood forest production (Rattan) ……….. 10

10. Rehabilitation ……… 11

11. Progress of industrial forest plantation ………. 11

12. Organization structure of the Ministry of Forestry ……… 12

13. Education background of staff of the Ministry of Forestry ……… 13

14. Age of staff of the Ministry of Forestry ………. 13

15. Career level of staff of the Ministry of Forestry ………. 13

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1. Matrix of Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009 (revised) …. 26 2. Matrix of target estimation of Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry

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Which refer to Forestry Act No. 41 of1999 concerning the forestry, Act No. 25 of 2004 concerning National Development Planning System, Act No. 32 of 2004 concerning Autonomus, Government Regulation No.20 of 2004 concerning Government Action Plan, Government Regulation No.44 of 2004 concerning Forestry Planning, and other related legal aspects, this strategic plan was formed as the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry Period 2005-2009 which will guide forestry development in Indonesia.

The Strategic Plan also referring to five priority policy of forestry developments as stated in the Minister of Forestry Decree No. SK.456/Menhut-VII/2004, that are, a) Combating illegal logging in the state forest and preventing illegal trade; b) Forestry sector revitalizing in particular forest industry; c) Rehabilitation and conservation of Forest resources; d) Empowerment of economic community within and surrounding the forest; and e) Securing forest area for strenghtening and promoting sustainable forest management.

B.

AIM AND OBJECTIVES

The aim of Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry is to harmonise forestry development planning holistically, integrated and efficien, and synergy with other developments sectors, in order to provide the national development objective.

While the objective of The Strategic gives a directions and strategies of forestry development programs and activities for 2005-2009.

C.

SCOPE

The Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009 contains:

1. Visions and Missions of the Ministry of Forestry; 2. Current condition of the Forest and forestry up to 2005;

3. Expected conditions of the forests and forestry in the period 2005-2009; 4. Identification of problems, their analysis, and the assumptions used;

5. Policies, programs, and main activities of the Ministry of Forestry in the period 2005-2009.

D.

REVISED PROCESS OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN

Revised process of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry for 2005-2009 adopted a participatory, transparent and responsible approach; and It’s developed throght communication and consultation with Ministry of forestry-officials since April 2006 for more than three months.

Revised of the startegic plan focused on enhancement of strategic goal and main activities of forestry development. While relevant contents of the previous startegic plan which issued by Minister of Forestry Regulation No. P.04/Menhut-II/2005, date 14 February 2004 are still used.

Revised format of the strategic plan refers to the National Admnistration Institute, the Medium Term of National Development Plan, and Act No. 25 of 2004 concerning National Development Planning System.

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E.

CONCEPTIONAL FLOW CHART

The conceptional flow chart of the development of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry is as follows (Figure 2)

Figure 2. Conceptional Chart of Development of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry

F. OUTPUT

The output of forestry development in 2009 is expected in line with the national development target of “Unity Indonesian Cabinet” such as 6.6% of economic growth/year, empowering development in riel sector, revitalization in agricultural sector (include forestry and fishery), and empowerment economic communities. Those developments concern to overcome the national priority problems that are poverty allevation, job opportunities improvement, invesment and export improvement, law enforcement, and combating corruption, that attained through consecutive goals as follow:

1. Existing forest covers throughout 282 priority Watersheds to provide a protection function of forest in order to prevent natural disaster and maintain water reserve for supporting overall development sector’s. Hence its goal shall open bussiness and job opprtunities surrounding the forest.

2. Various benefit of forest resources are utilized in accordance with forest function and its beneficiary in order to support empowerment of economic community within and surrounding the forest.

3. Synergetic approach between people and forest resources are developed by considering three base beneficiary that are social, environment, and economy, so that forest areas are legitimated, and these provides revitalization of forestry sector.

4. Good gevenance in the forest resources management is developed, supporting by reward and punishment system, so sustainability of forest resources management ensures wood demand, and prevent a negative threathen to the forest existence. These condition are close related with the prosperity and welfare of people surrounding the forest.

5. Securing existence of forests resources in adequate extent and proportional distribution,

Vision Mision Objectives

Goal Strategy

- Analisys - Assumption

- Policy - Programe - Main Activities

Mandate : - Act 41 of 1999 - Act 5 of 1990

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CHAPTER 2.

VISION AND MISSION

A. VISION

In accordance with Article 3 of Act 41 of 1999 concerning Forestry, with the conditions of forests and forestry in Indonesia, and with the approval of the 2004-2009 House of Representatives, the vision of forestry development has been defined as follows:

“Realisation of Forestry Governance for Securing Forests

Sustainability and Promoting People’s Prosperity”

Based on the vision, the Ministry of Forestry carries out forest governance to obtain optimum and sustainable benefits for the greatest, equitable prosperity of the people.

The priority goals for attainment of the Ministry of Forestry’s vision in the medium-term (2005-2009) are as follows:

1. Decentralisation on forestry developmentis is achieved and supported by stakeholders for increasing community welfare and supporting forest resources sustainability.

2. Combatting illegal logging and its associated trade;

3. Implementation of sustainable forest management principles by estabilishing Forest Management Unit (FMU) at list one’s unit for each province;

4. Development of plantation forests of 5.0 million hectares, and forest land rehabilitation of 5.0 million hectares.

5. Establishment of 20 National Parks Model;

6. Revitalization and development of community forest, in particular outside of Java. 7. Revitalization of 282 priority watersheds to optimize forest functions;

8. Improvement of vary bussines of Non Timber Forest Products (NTFP) and

environmental services commercially.

9. Improvement of labour absorption of 3-10 %, and increasing community income within and surrounding the forest by 3-4% per capita.

10. Gazettement of 12 million hectare of forest area.

B. MISSION

In accordance with Act 41 of 1999 concerning Forestry, Act 5 of 1990 concerning

Conservation of Natural Resources and its Ecosystems, and aproval of House of

Representatives (period 2004-2009) on 01 December 2004, the missions of the Ministry of Forestry are as follows:

1. Securing forests existence with adequate extent and distributed proportionally;

2. Optimising different functions of forests and water ecosystems, which include

conservation, protection, wood and non-wood products, and environmental services, to obtain environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits;

3. Increasing the carrying capacity of watersheds; 4. Promoting people’s participation;

5. Securing equitable and sustainable distribution of forest benefits;

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CHAPTER 3.

PRESENT CONDITION

The condition of forests and forestry in Indonesia up to 2004 is as described below.

A.

ENVIRONMENT

Up to 2005, the Government has designated 126.8 million hectares forest area, comprising 23.2 million hectares of conservation forests, 32.4 million hectares of protection forests, 21.6 million hectares of limited production forests, 35.6 million hectares of production forests, and 14.0 million hectares of convertible production forests.

According to researches, Indonesia’s forests and marine teritory have high biological diversity, which is reflected by the fauna and flora biodiversities: 515 mammal species (12% of world’s mammals), 511 reptile species (7.3% of world’s reptiles), 1531 bird species (17% of world’s birds), 270 amphibian species, 2827 invertebrate species, and 38,000 plant species (IBSAP, 2003).

The population and distribution of those resources are declining because of inapropriate utilisation of forest resources, such as: over-utilisation (flora/fauna), new uses of forest lands (legal and illegal), and forest fires such as the one in 1997 which affected 5.2 million hectares (Figure 3).

Up to 2002 degraded forest lands were recorded at 59.7 million hectares, while critical lands both within and outside forest areas were 42.1 million hectares. Some of these areas are located in the watersheds with high priority for rehabilitation. Up to 2004, the Government had prioritised rehabilitation of 458 watersheds, of which 282 are of first and second priority (Figure 4).

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Figure 5. Graphical Trends of Conservation Areas Figure 4. Critical land

The Government has decided to protect endangered species, including 57 plant species and 236 wildlife species through issuance of Government Regulation No. 7 of 1999 concerning Conservation of Plant and Wildlife Species. In order to handle trades in endangered plant and wildlife species, Indonesia has signed the Convention on CITES and enlisted 1,053 plant species and 1,384 wildlife species in Appendices I and II.

In order to preserve ecosystems and the biological diversity, up to 2004 the Government has established terresterial conservation areas, i.e.: 44 units of National Parks (NP), 104 units of Nature Recreation Parks, 17 units of Forest Parks, 14 units of Hunting Parks, 214 units of Nature Reserves, and 63 units of Wildlife Reserves. Marine conservation areas have also been established: 6 units of Marine National Parks, 9 units of Nature Reserves, 6 units of Wildlife Reserves, 18 units of Nature Recreation Parks. (Figure 5).

At the global level, apart from CITES, Indonesia has also ratified and participated actively in the UNFCCC, Kyoto Protocol, UNCBD, UNCCD, RAMSAR Convension and World Heritage. In addition, Indonesia also actively participates in the Committee on Forest (COFO)/FAO, ITTO and UNFF as well as other global and regional agreements.

Sanctuary Reserve Area/SRA

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B.

SOCIAL

Based on the 2003 census, Indonesia’s population was 220 million people. CIFOR (2004) and BPS (2000) describe that about 48.8 million people live around forests and about 10.2 million of them are poor. Six million people are directly dependent on the forest as the source of earnings, of which 3.4 million work in the private sector of forestry. Traditionally, a lot of people earn their living by using different forest products, both wood and non-wood ones (such as rattan, resin, agarwood, and honey).

Education and health conditions of people living around forests are generally not as good as in urban areas. Access to facilities are relatively low. Among others, the sanitation system of housing complexes is poor. As the population density of the forest communities increases, the social quality of the people generally declines.

Efforts to improve the social condition of the forest communities have been promoted by the Government, including through: Forest Community Development by 169 forest concession companies (outside Java), Community Based Forest Management by Perhutani State Enterprise (Java), and Community Forestry. In 2003 Forest Community Development was carried out in 267 villages (with 20,542 households), and Community Forestry covered 50,644 hectares.

The Social Forestry Program was launched by the President on 2 July 2003 in Palangkaraya. This program was meant to give opportunities for local communities as actors or main partners in the management of forest resources. Up to now institutional facilitation has been carried out in 7 provinces, through establishment of productive business groups and development of inter-sector plans of activities.

C.

ECONOMIC

Commercial utilisation of forests, especially natural forests, which started in 1967, has put forestry as an important sector in the national economy. Indonesia managed to lead in the world tropical timber export, including through export of logs, sawntimber, plywood, and other wood products. During the period 1992 – 1997 Indonesia’s foreign exchange earnings from forestry was US$16.0 billion, which on annual average contribute 3.5% of the GDP (BPS, 2004).

In 2003 forestry export was officially reported at US$ 6.6 billion or about 13.7% of the total non-oil-and-gas export. It comprised US$ 2.8 billion from exports of plywood and sawnwood, US$ 2.4 billion from pulp and paper, US$ 1.1 billion from furniture, and the rest was from other processed wood. However, it was estimated that it could reach US$ 8.0 billion when including unrecorded exports (CIFOR, 2003).

The golden era of forest industries has declined since 1990. This is shown among others by the decline in the number of forest concession companies from 560 companies with permited production of 27 million m3 in 1990, to 270 companies with permited production of 23.8 million m3 in 2002.

The decline continued in 2003 with permited production of 6.8 milion m3 in 2003 and 5.8 million m3 in 2004. Realisation of log production from different sources of production from 1997-2003 is shown in Figure 6.

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Government’s income from Reforestation Fund, Interest of the Reforestation Fund, Forest Product Fees, Plantation Forest Concession Fees, Natural Forest Concession Fees, Export of Wildlife, Fine from Forest Utilisation Infringement, as well as Nature Tourism Enterprise Levies in 1999 was IDR 3.33 trillion, and in 2003 IDR 2,72 trillion. (Figure 7).

Forest utilization from 1989 to 2003 decline both in area and the number of business enterprises. The number of forest utilisation enterprises in 2003 was 267, which declined by 52.1 % from that of 1989 (Figure 8).

Figure7. Trends of Forestry Non-Tax Income

3,

99/00 2000 2001 2002 2003

Years

Figure 6. Realisation of Log Production

29.15

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003

Vo

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003

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Figure 9. Non-Wood Forest Products (Rattan)

Wood processing industries in 2003 were 1881 in number, comprising: 1,618 sawmills with a total capacity of 11.048 million m3; 107 plymills with a total capacity of 9.43 million m3; 6 pulpmills with a total capacity of 3.98 million m3, 78 blockboard industries with a total capacity of 2.08 million m3; and 73 other wood working industries with a total capacity of 3.15 million m3.

However, the decline of forestry industries’ contribution was balanced by increase of the non-wood forest products’ contribution (rattan, charcoal, and resin), which amounted US$ 8.4 million in 1999 and increased to US$ 19.74 million in 2002. The contribuiton of trade in wildlife and plants in 1999 was US $ 61.3 thousands, which sharply increased to US$ 3.34 million in 2003 (Figure 9).

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Cumulat ive Change of Ext ent of For est Consession Ext ent of Forest Consessions

Number of Forest Consessions

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Figure 11. Progress of Industrial Forest Plantation

Reforestation in 1999 covered 12,102 hectares and in 2003 it increased to 52,200 hectares. Forest and Land Rehabilitation through the National Campaign for Forest and Land Rehabilitation (Gerhan) up to 2004 covered 252 thousand hectares (Figure 10).

Industrial Forest Plantation Development has also shown encouraging progress, though implementation has been relatively slow. From 1989 to 2003, 96 Industrial Forest Plantation companies were given licenses, which covered 5.4 million hectares. However, up to 2004 the implementation only covered 3.12 million hectares. (Figure 11)

In 2000, employment in the forestry sector from planting, harvesting, to the industries involved 3,092,470 people, with average income in forest concession companies of IDR 7.3 million/year/person, and in the industries it was IDR 3.3 million/year/person (BPS, 2000).

Forestry development has contributed significantly to local development. This is shown by the increased access to isolated areas because of availability of forest harvesting roads for the forest communities, increased employment opportunities, and increased income of the local government and local people.

Figure 10. Rehabilitation

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1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003

Years

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D.

INSTITUTION

In accordance with Decree of Minister of Forestry No. 123/Kpts-II/2001, the organisation of the Ministry of Forestry comprises Secretariat General, Inspectorate General, Directorate General of Forest Production, Directorate Geneal of Land Rehabilitation and Social Forestry, Directorate General of Forest Protection and Nature Conservation, Agency of Forestry Planning, Agency of Forestry Research and Development, and Minister’s Senior Advisers (Figure 12).

According to Act No. 41 of 1999 concerning Forestry and Act No. 32 of 2004 concerning Local Government, forest governance at sub-national levels consists of:

1. Decentralisation/transfer of authority and responsibility to Provinces and

District/Municipalities;

2. Deconcentration that is managed by technical implementing units of the Ministry of Forestry;

3. Assistantship, i.e. implementation of Central Government’s tasks by Sub-National Governments.

In the implementation of the deconstration, the Ministry of Forestry has Technical Implementing Units (TIUs) that comprise TIUs for Watershed Management (31 unit); TIUs for Forest Area Stabilisation (11 units); TIUs for Natural Resources Conservation (32 units), TIUs for National Parks (33 units), TIUs for Certification of Forest Products Graders (17 units), TIUs for Watershed Technology Research and Development (2 units), TIUs for Plantation Forest Research and Development (2 units), TIUs for Forestry Research and Development (8 units), TIUs for Sericulture (1 unit), TIUs for Seed Technology (1 unit), TIUs for Forestry Education and Training (7 units), and TIUs for Seed and Forest Plantation (6 units).

In order to achieve synchronisation and coordination of forestry development planning and implementation between national and sub-national goverenments, by issuing Decree of Minister of Forestry No. SK. 103/Menhut-II/2004 the Ministry of Forestry has established Centres for Regional Forestry Development for four regions: Region I covers Sumatra; Region II covers Jawa, Bali, and Nusa Tenggara; Region III covers Kalimantan; and Region IV covers Sulawesi, Maluku and Papua.

As of May 2004 the Ministry of Forestry had 14,875 staff, comprising 3,392 at the headquarters and 11,483 at the technical implementing units. In terms of education, almost 70% are graduates from primary school to senior high schools (Figure 13) and 43% are aged between 37-46 years (Figure 14). In terms of career, 54% are from grades I and II (Figure 15),

MINISTER OF FORESTRY

INSPECTORATE GENERAL

SECRETARIAT GENERAL

DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF

FOREST PROTECTION AND NATURE CONSERVATION

DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF

LAND REHABILITATION

AND SOCIAL FORESTRY

DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF

FOREST PRODUCTION AGENCY OF

FORESTRY PLANNING

AGENCY OF FORESTRY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

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Elementary School (4.38%) Ph.D (0.53%)

Master (3.97%)

Junior High School (3.54%)

Senior High School (61.84%)

Undergraduate (21.77%)

Diploma (3.97%)Diploma

(3.97%)

Senior High School (61.84%)

Ph.D (0.53%)

Undergraduate (21.77%) Master (3.97%) Elementary

School (4.38%)

Junior High School (3.54%)

37-46

(43%) >46

(27%)

<36 (30%)

Grade II

(51.58%) Grade III (40.62%)

Grade IV (5.20%)

Male

(70.40%)

Female (29.60%

Male (86.70%)

Female (13.30%

-10.0 20.0 30.0 40.0 50.0 60.0 70.0 80.0 90.0

Headquarter Technical Implementing Unit

Grade I (2.61%)

and gender wise there are less female than male staff, both at the national and sub-national levels (Figure 16).

Figure 13. Education Background Figure 14. Age of Staff

Figure 15. Career Levels of Staff Figure 16. Staff at Headquarters and Technical Implementing Units

As of end of 2004 forestry sector development, policies and activities are based on the following laws and regulation, among others:

1. Act No. 5 of 1990 concerning Natural Resources Conservation and Its Ecosystems; 2. Act No. 24 of 1992 concerning Spatial Planning;

3. Act No. 41 of 1999 concerning Forestry (which ammended Act No. 5 of 1967); 4. Act No. 25 of 2004 concerning National Development Planning System;

5. Act No. 32 of 2004 concerning Local Government (which ammended Act No. 22 of

1999);

6. Act No. 34 of 2004 concerning Financial Distribution Between Central and Sub-National Governments (which ammended Act No. 25 of 1999);

7. Government Regulations which elaborate Act No. 41 of 1999, including: Government Regulation No. 34 of 2002 concerning Forest Administration, Forest Management Planning, Forest Utilization, and Forest Lands Use for Non-Forestry Purposes; Government Regulation No. 35 of 2002 concerning Reforestation Fund; Government Regulation No. 44 of 2004 concerning Forestry Planning; Government Regulation No. 45 of 2004 concerning Forest Protection.

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CHAPTER 4.

EXPECTED CONDITIONS

The target of forestry development in 2009 is expected in line with the national development target of “Unity Indonesia Cabinet” such as 6.6% of economic growth/year, empowering development of the riel sector, revitalization of agricultural sector (include forestry and fishery), and empowerment of economic communities. Those developments concern to overcome the national priority problems that are poverty reduction, labour absorbtion, improvement of invesment and export, law enforcement, and combating corruption, and these can be achieved through several targets as follow:

A. Improvement of living quality and welfare of the people by

establishing Watersheds Management System which provides

sustainability of water preservation for whole sectors. These target can be

achieved by :

1. Preparation of macros data such as forest cover, forest resources potential (timber and non timber), forest resources balance, in which packaged spatial and non spatial form, and accessible for public;

2. Forest area designation and marine conservation are issued by the Minister of Forestry throughout Indonesia;

3. Forests and land rehabilitation in the 282 priority Watersheds for 5.0 million hectare with proportioning 60% within the forest, and 40% outside the forest;

4. Establishment of civil technic construstion that established in the representative location of the 282 priority Watersheds for controlling flood, erosion, sedimentation, and landslide.

B. Improvement of community access on productive resources and

capitals, diversification of community economics, and involvement of

community participations. These target can be achieved by :

1. Development of forest plantation increases the labour absorption by 7 % each year;

2. Land and forest rahabilitation within 282 priority Watersheds is fully provided by stakeholders, and absorps labour by 10%;

3. Development of 20 National Park models increases the labour absorption and community income by 5%;

4. Management of 200 conservation area will absorp the local labours;

5. Commercial endanger-species breeding is developed;

6. Development of utilization of flora, fauna, and environmental services increases the labour absorption by 4%;

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8. Community and plantation forest are improved by 500,000.00 hectare with production of 40 m3/hectare.

9. Involvement of people in the development of community and plantation forest are increased by 3% per year, and local-community welfare by 4%;

10. Sustainable and commercial utilization of NTFP is increased by 3% per year, and it able to increase absorption of the local-labour by 3%;

11. Community-based forest management is achieved and improved in the several provinces such as Bengkulu, Lampung, Yogyakarta, West Nusatenggara, East Nusatenggara, West kalimantan, Central Kalimantan, South Kalimantan, Southeast Sulawesi, ans South Sulawesi;

12. Community-base forest management is able to increase absorption of the local-labour by 3%, and local-community welfare by 4%;

13. Improvement of primary-industry is able to increase utilzation of raw materials efficiently, and labour absorption by 9%;

14. Law and regulation of forestry is available and rightful completely;

15. Information of forestry development is objective and sustainable, and provided by apropiate data, and its presented continously to the stakeholders at the nasional and global level.

C. Realisation of forestry governance, enhancement of combatting

corruptions, improvement of public services; protection and

prevention of forest fire and illegal logging, and protection of natural

disaster.

These target can be achieved by :

1

.

Decentralisation on forestry developmentis is achieved and supported by

stakeholders for increasing community welfare and supporting forest resources sustainability;

2. Forestry communities in the whole level are established, and they aware and involve in the forestry developments;

3. Stipulation of 12 million hectare forest area, by emphasizing to the conservation forest, and other legitimated forest areas;

4. Seed orchards of forest plants are established for 4,500 hectare throughout 12 province;

5. Forests plantation area is improved by 5 million hectare with production of 100m3 per hectare, and labour absorption increased by 7%;

6. No more leaking out of non-tax revenue of forestry, and the non-tax revenue of wood is increased by 10%;

7. Information and early-warning detection of forest fire is implemented, and also prevention and extinguished of forest fires in the community level is run efectively;

8. Law enforcement in the forestry sector is properly implemented (clearly, fairly, and transparance);

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10. Financial support for forestry development is appropriate in accordance with priority activities, time frame, and alocation;

11. Implementation of forestry development is integrated and coordinated on each regional level;

12. Organization and its adminstration of forestry in the central and province/district level is run effective and responsive in line with development requirement;

13. Corruption, colussion, nepotisme, and other unexpected attitude of forestry apparatus decline significantly.

D. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of forestry increases by 2.1% in order

to support economic growth from agriculture side (include fishery

and forestry). These target can be achieved by :

1. Non Tax Revenue of forestry from utilization of wildlife and environmental services is increased by 3%;

2. Result of research and development on forestry is able to improve productivity of forestry by 5%;

3. Production of forest industry is increased by 10% and competitive in global market;

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CHAPTER 5.

PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION

Based on the description of current conditions and the expected conditions, some problems in the forestry development are identified. Poblems identification are used to justified the definition of objectives, targets, policies, and programs, in accordance with the vision and missions that have been defined.

Analysis of the current conditions and the target conditions show that there are two root problems in the field of forestry, i.e.:

a. Management of forest functions are not optimum;

b. Roles and distribution of benefits are not equitable.

The reasons and causes of each of the above root problems are described below.

A. Management of forest functions are not optimum

1. Forest areas are not stable because of, among others:

a. Spatial planning is not well coordinated;

b. Management units of all forest-function areas are not yet completely established;

c. Forest use is not yet community oriented.

2. Forest resources are declining because of, among others:

a. Forest resource utilisation focuses too much on wood products;

b. Control over forest resource management is weak.

c. Law enforcement on forest management infringement is inadequate.

d. Forest rehabilitation rate is less than forest and land degradation rate.

B. Roles and distribution of benefits are not equitable

1. The forestry industries are not efficient because of, among others:

a. Lack of clear direction and serious support from the Government in developing competitive forestry industries;

b. Lack of equity in the distribution of benefits from forestry industries.

2. Forest resource related economic activities of the communities are not optimum because of, among others:

a. Laws and regulations that control people’s acces to forests are not adequate;

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CHAPTER 6.

ANALYSIS AND ASSUMPTIONS

A.

Identification of Strengthen, Weakness, Challenges, and

Opportunities

In this Strategic Plan, the analysis to determine strategies, targets and programs for the next five years uses a SWOT review. The review analyses strengths, constraints/weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges/threats.

1. Among the strengths to be utilised are:

a. Existence of Ministry of Forestry as the administer of sustainable forest management;

b. Laws and regulations on forestry which support management of forest resources (Act No. 41 of 1999, Government Regulation No. 34 of 2002, Act No. 32 of 2004, Government Regulation No. 35 of 2002, Government Regulation No. 44 of 2004, and other supporting Decisions of Minister of Forestry);

c. Available human resources and forest and forestry resources;

d. Results of forestry development so far undertaken can serve as the starting points for further development.

2. Some constraints/weaknesses which need addressing are, among others:

a. Institutions and their capacity to manage forest resources are still inadequate, which is indicated by the limited number of forest management units that ae fully operational; b. Forest industries lack clear direction, competitiveness and serious support from the

government;

c. Distribution of roles among the communities is not equitable;

d. Distribution of benefits from forest resources is not equitable;

e. Use of forestry human resources for forest management is not optimum;

f. Science and technology are not in line with forest management;

g. Security and services for forestry businesses are inadequate;

h. Synergy in forest governance is inadequate;

i. Access to forestry policies and information is inadequate;

j. Forestry laws and regulations cannot be fully implemented;

k. Equipments and infrastructure supporting forestry development are inadequate.

3. Some challenges/threatens which need anticipating are, among others:

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b. Forest fires are not completely under control;

c. Forest areas are not yet stable;

d. People living within and around forests are poor;

e. Employment in the field of forestry is inadequate;

f. Need for lands for different purposes is great;

g. Need for access to forestry business has increased;

h. Policies on forestry development investment are not interesting.

4. Some opportunities which can be used are, among others:

a. Potential for forest resource utilisation is great;

b. There is a commitment within the country in forest governance;

c. International support to sustainable forest resource management is great;

d. There are forestry partners and potential roles of the communities to support forestry development;

e. There is high dependence on forest resources;

f. Market demand on forest products is high;

g. Investment opportunity in the field of forestry is high.

B

.

Analysis

Based on the strengths, opportunities, constraints and challenges as identified through the SWOT approach, some alternative strategies for forestry development in the medium term are identified, which are classified into the following four:

1. Strategy to use strengts for making use of opportunities;

2. Strategy to address constraints/weaknesses by using opportunities;

3. Strategy to use strengths for addressing challenges/ threats;

4. Strategy to reduce weaknesses and address challenges/ threats.

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EXTERNAL FACTOR

INTERNAL FACTOR

Strenth:

1. Existence of Ministry of Forestry exists as the administer of sustainable forest management;

2. Laws and regulation on forestry which support management of forest resources (Act No. 41 of 1999, Government Regulation No. 34 of 2002, Act No. 32 of 2004, Government Regulation No. 35 of 2002, Government Regulation No. 44 of 2004, and other supporting Decisions of Minister of Forestry); 3. Available Forestry human resources;

4. Available forest resources;

5. Results of forestry development so far undertaken.

Constraints/Weaknesses:

1. Institutions and the capacity to manage forest resources are still inadequate, which is indicated by the limited number of forest management units that are fully operational;

2. Forest industries lack clear direction, competitiveness and serious support from the government;

3. Distribution of roles among the communities is not equitable; 4. Distribution of benefits from forest resources is not equitable; 5. Use of forestry human resources for forest management is not

optimum;

6. Science and technology are not in line with forest management; 7. Security and services for forestry businesses are inadequate; 8. Synergy in forest governance is inadequate;

9. Access to forestry policies and information is inadequate; 10. Forestry laws and regulations cannot be fully implemented; 11. Equipments and infrastructure supporting forestry

development are inadequate.

Opportunities:

1. Potential for forest resource utilisation is great;

2. There is a commitment within the country to undertake forest governance;

3. International support to sustainable forest resource management is great;

4. There are forestry partners and potential roles of the communities to support forestry development; 5. There is high dependence on forest resources; 6. Market demand on forest products is high;

7. Investment opportunity in the field of forestry is high.

STRATEGY: USING STRENGTHS TO USE OPPORTUNITIES

1. Coordination in the handling of forest protection problems 2. Sustainable Forest Management Certification

3. Promotion of the management of Non Timber Forest Product (NTFP)

4. Acceleration of plantation forest development 5. Increase of Non Tax State Income from forestry sector 6. Development and strengthening of conservation area

management

7. Acceleration of the forest gazettement process 8. Sustaining the existence of forest areas 9. Promotion of utilisaton of forest functions

10. Making use of international support to sustainable forest

STRATEGY: ADDRESSING CONSTRAINTS/ WEAKNESSES BY USING OPPORTUNITIES

1. Enhanced facilitation of the performance of forestry industries 2. Community based protection and utilisation of natural

resources

3. Development of people’s forests

4. Supporting enhanced utilisation of environmental services 5. Promotion of community participaton

6. Increased access for the communities to forestry policies and information

7. Establishment of forest (production, protection) management units

8. Coordination and synchronisation with other sectors in land use planning

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management

11. Acceleration of provision of spatial and non-spatial data and information

12. Development and improvement of forestry plans

10. Development of science and technology

11. Enhancement of profesionalism of forestry human resources 12. Promotion of communication and consultation among

stakeholders

Challenges/Threats:

1. Illegal harvest of forest products, both wood and non-wood, as well as their trades, still continue;

2. Forest fires are not completely under control; 3. Forest areas are not yet stable;

4. People living within and surrounding forests are poor; 5. Employment in the field of forestry is inadequate; 6. Need for lands for different purposes is great; 7. Need for access to forestry business has increased; 8. Policies on forestry development investment are not

interesting.

9. There are large areas of degraded forests and high rate of forest degradation.

STRATEGY: USING STRENGTHS TO ADDRESS CHALLENGES/ THREATS

1. Law enforcement in forest protection 2. Acceleration of forest and land rehabilitation

3. Strengthening the management and function of watersheds 4. Elevating the effectiveness of forest fire management 5. Provision of management roles for the communities

surrounding forests

STRATEGY: REDUCING WEAKNESSES AND ADDRESSING CHALLENGES/ THREATS

1. Synchronisation of forest governance by central and local governments

2. Promotion of economic development of people living within and surrounding forests

3. Promotion of forestry small and medium enterprises

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C.

Assumptions

In order to achieve realistic and proportionate targets of forestry development for the medium term 2005-2009, some basic assumptions were used. The assumptions were considered in the analysis of each strategy that is included in the SWOT analysis.

The basic assumptions are, among others:

1. The Ministry Strategic Plan gets support and commitment from the staff of the Ministry of Forestry;

2. Competent forestry human resources are available and can be fully used;

3. Forestry development regulation and policies support the programs that are determined in the Ministry Strategic Plan.

4. Stakeholders and other sectors fully support and participate in the forestry development;

5. The required budget for forestry development is available as scheduled;

6. Monitoring and evaluation of forestry development run effectively;

7. Political, security, economic and social stabilities are maintained.

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CHAPTER 7.

POLICIES, PROGRAMS, AND MAIN

ACTIVITIES

A

.

POLICIES

In order to achieve the medium term development goals as described above, the Ministry of Forestry has determined 5 (five) priority policies for the period 2005-2009 (Decision of Minister of Forestry No. SK.456/Menhut-VII/2004), i.e.:

1. Combating illegal logging within the state forests and its illegal trade;

2. Revitalisation of forestry sector, in particular forest industries;

3. Conservation and rehabilitation of forest resources;

4. Empowering Economic of community within and surrounding of forests area;

5. Stabilization of forest area for promoting and stengthening of sustainable forest management.

B

.

PROGRAMME

Based on the vision, missions, objectives, goals and policies, the Ministry of Forestry has determined 6 (six) forestry development programs for the period 2005-2009, which have been integrated into the National Medium Term Development Plan 2004-2009. The major programs are as follows:

1. Program of Stabilization of Security in the Country.

2. Program of Improved Utilisation of Forest Resource Potential;

3. Program of Rehabilitation and Conservation of Natural Resources;

4. Program of Rehabilitation and Recovery of Natural Resource Reserves;

5. Program of Enhanced Capacity to Manage Natural Resources and Environment;

6. Program of Improved Access to Information on Natural Resources and Environment.

In order to support the major activities and to accommodate routine activities of the Ministry of Forestry, some other programs are also needed, i.e.: Career Training; Governance Administration; Research, Development and Science; Promotion of Inspection, and Accountability of Civil Servants.

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C. MAIN ACTIVITIES

The major activities which support the priority development policies of the Ministry of Forestry are as follows:

1. Combating illegal logging and its associated trade, with the following major activities, among others:

a. Provision of information on locations with high risk of illegal logging;

b. Campaigning for encouraging communities who care for curbing illegal logging; c. Reduction of forest encroachment;

d. Intensifying coordination measures with the Police and Arm Forces, Attorney General, and other sectors related to illegal logging to prosecute forestry crimes;

e. Conducting operations to curb illegal logging and illegal trade.

2. Revitalization of forestry sector, in particular forest industries, with the major activities, among others:

a. Facilitation of enhancement of the performance of forestry industries;

b. Implementation of sustainable forest management in 200 units of natural forest and plantation forest concessionaires;

c. Promotion of non timber forest products;

d. Optimisation of non tax incomes and Reforestation Fund;

e. Facilitation of industrial forest plantation development to reach at least 5 million hectares; f. Facilitation of development of people’s forests to reach 2 million hectares.

3. Conservation and rehabilitation of Forest resources, with the major activities, among others: a. Enhancing the effectiveness of forest and land rehabilitation to cover 5 million hectares,

including rehabilitation of mangrove forests and coastal forests (60 % within forest areas, 40 % outside forest areas);

b. Management and utilisation of conservation areas in 200 nature reserves and nature conservation units.

c. Establishment of 20 units of indepandent national parks that are operational; d. Management of forest fires.

e. Enhancing the optimum functioning of 282 priority watersheds, including the functions of waterhshed in protecting vital objects (such as dams, power plants).

f. Promoting improved management of environmental services through recreation forest management.

4. Empowering Economic of community within and surrounding of forest area, with such major activities as:

a. Promotion of economic development of communities living within and around forests; b. Improvement of the business conditions for small and medium enterprises as well as

communities’ access to forests;

c. Provision of assurance for availability of raw materials for forestry small and medium enterprises;

d. Promotion of community economic empowerment.

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a. Fasilitation of establishment of production forest management units, protection forest management units, and conservation forest management units.

b. Intensification of forest area designation;

c. Intensification of legal recognition of forest areas, to cover 30 % of the forests already subjected to boundary demarcation;

d. Coordination and synchronisation with other sectors in the land use planning process; e. Maintenance of existing forest areas;

f. Provision of complete information on natural forest resources, the non-timber forest products, the wildlife, as well as the environmental and tourism services;

g. Provision of spatial and non-spatial forestry data/ information.

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REFERENCES

Badan Perencanaan Pembangunan Nasional (Bappenas). 2003. Strategi dan Rencana Aksi Keanekaragaman Hayati Indonesia 2003-2020, IBSAP, Dokumen Nasional. Jakarta.

Biro Pusat Statistik, 1993-2004. Statistik Indonesia 1993-2004. jakarta

Cites Secretary. 2005. http://www.cites.org

Departemen Kehutanan. 2004. Statistik Kehutanan Indonesia 2003. Jakarta.

Departemen Kehutanan 2002. Masterplan rehabilitasi Hutan dan Lahan nasional. Jakarta.

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Matrix of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry 2005-2009

VISION : Realisation of Forestry Governance for Securing Forest Sustainability and Promoting People’s Prosperity.

MISSION GOAL STRATEGY TARGET

(STRATEGIC)

INDICATOR

(STRATEGIC) POLICY PROGRAMME

MAJOR ACTIVITY

RESPON-SIBLE

Securing existence of forests with adequate extent and proportional distribution.

1.Implementation of forest area gazettement

Acceleration of the forest area gazettement process

100 % designation of forest area all over Indonesia (including new provinces)

Decrees of Minister of Forestry on designation of forest and marine areas in the remaining provinces

Stabilisation of the Forest Land Area

Improved Utilisation of Forest Resources Potential

Issuance of Decree of Minister of Forestry concerning Forest Area Designation

Baplan, Setjen

Acceleration of the forest area gazettement process

Legal recognition of 30% of the forest areas already and to be subjected to boundary demarcation.

- Decrees on legal recognition of forest areas on Production Forests and Protection Forests (50 %) and 150 conservation areas, including Nature Reserves, Nature Conservation Areas, and Hunting Parks.

Stabilisation of the Forest Land Area

Improved Utilisation of Forest Resources Potential

- Implementation of boundary demarcation of forest areas - Implementation

of legal recognition of forest areas

Baplan, Setjen

- Issuance of Decrees on establishment of 9 National Parks

- Regulation of

legal recognition of forest areas

- Completion of boundary demarcation and legal recognition of 150 units of Nature Reserves, Nature Conservation Areas, and Hunting Parks.

Coordination and synchronisation with other sectors

Improved coordination and synchronisation with other sectors in land use planning

Problems in Provincial Spatial Planning and District Spatial Planning related to forest lands can be minimised.

Stabilisation of the Forest Land Area

Improved Utilisation of Forest Resources Potential

Implementation of inter sector coordination and synchronisation in the process of spatial planning and change of use of forest areas

Baplan

Acceleration of provision of spatial and non spatial data

Availability of information on living resources, which

comprise: 100%

- Macro data on forest land cover and species cover available in

Stabilisation of the Forest Land Area

Improvee quality and access to information on

- Implementation of national forest inventory

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MISSION GOAL STRATEGY TARGET (STRATEGIC)

INDICATOR

(STRATEGIC) POLICY PROGRAMME

MAJOR ACTIVITY

RESPON-SIBLE

and information information on land cover potential, 60% information on commercial and non commercial trees, 30%

information on environmental and recreation services at the national level.

numeric, spatial, and non spatial forms, and can be accessed by the public

- Forest Resource Account

natural resources and environment

- Facilitation of implementation of inventory at provincial, district/ municipality, and management unit levels - Facilitation of

development of provincial forest resource account - Development of

national forest resource account - Preparation of

forestry database - Development of

forestry statistics - Improvement

of the Information System for Access to Forestry Development - Provision of

spatial and non spatial data/ information

BPK, Balitbang

2.Secured and optimum extent and functions of forests

Optimisation of forest areas

At least forest areas already legally recognised can be sustained and can perform their designated functions

- 70 % evaluation of problems in forest area use change/ function change

- 70 % data and

Stabilisation of the Forest Land Area

Improved Utilisation of Forest Resources Potential

- Implementation of evaluation of forest land use changes - Implementation

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MISSION GOAL STRATEGY TARGET (STRATEGIC)

INDICATOR

(STRATEGIC) POLICY PROGRAMME

MAJOR ACTIVITY

RESPON-SIBLE

and land cover on all watershed and islands.

of satellite imagery, including ground checks Optimising

different functions of forest and water ecosystems, which include

conservation, protection, production of wood, non-wood products and environmental services, to obtain environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits in a balance and sustainable manners

1.Implementation of forest management administration and governance

Improvement of forest industries’ performance

Facilitation of improved performance of forestry industries by 50% from 2004 performance

At least 300 forestry industries (capacity more than 6,000 m3/year) run efficiently and

competitively at the global market.

Revitalisation of forestry sector, especially for the forest industry

Improved Utilisation of Forest Resources Potential

- Preparation of deregulation in forestry industries - Intensification

of supervision of forest industries - Formulation of

incentives for promoting forest industries

Ditjen BPK

Certificaiton of sustainable forest management

Sustainable Forest Managment on 200 units

At least 100 natural forest concesisonaires and plantation forest

concessionaires have SFM certificates.

Revitalisation of forestry sector, especially for the forest industry

Improved Utilisation of Forest Resources Potential

- Preparation of deregulations in forest

utilisations - SFM

certification for natural forest and plantation forest concessionaires - Intensification

of supervision of forest utilisation activities

Ditjen BPK, Setjen, Balitbang

Improvemed management of non

Non timber forest products increase by 30%

Contribution of income from non wood timber

Revitalisation of forestry

Improved Utilisation of

- Preparation of regulation on

Figur

Figure 1. Contribution of the Forestry Sector to the National GDP

Figure 1.

Contribution of the Forestry Sector to the National GDP . View in document p.12
Figure 2. Conceptional Chart of Development of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry

Figure 2.

Conceptional Chart of Development of the Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Forestry . View in document p.17
Figure 3. Forest Fire

Figure 3.

Forest Fire. View in document p.19
Figure  4. Critical land

Figure 4.

Critical land. View in document p.20
Figure 6. Realisation of Log Production

Figure 6.

Realisation of Log Production. View in document p.22
Figure 9. Non-Wood Forest Products (Rattan)

Figure 9.

Non Wood Forest Products Rattan . View in document p.23
Figure 8. Trends of Forest Utilisation Licenses

Figure 8.

Trends of Forest Utilisation Licenses. View in document p.23
Figure 10. Rehabilitation

Figure 10.

Rehabilitation. View in document p.24
Figure 11. Progress of Industrial Forest Plantation

Figure 11.

Progress of Industrial Forest Plantation. View in document p.24
Figure 12.  Organisation Structure of the Ministry of Forestry

Figure 12.

Organisation Structure of the Ministry of Forestry . View in document p.25
Figure 13. Education Background

Figure 13.

Education Background . View in document p.26

Referensi

Memperbarui...

Lainnya : Index of /ProdukHukum/kehutanan AIM AND OBJECTIVES SCOPE REVISED PROCESS OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN VISION MISSION VISION AND MISSION SOCIAL INSTITUTION PRESENT CONDITION EXPECTED CONDITIONS Index of /ProdukHukum/kehutanan Among the strengths to be utilised are: Some constraintsweaknesses which need addressing are, among others: Some challengesthreatens which need anticipating are, among others: Some opportunities which can be used are, among others: Assumptions ANALYSIS AND ASSUMPTIONS Development of Assessment Information System of Forest Area Gazettement. Preparation and Evaluation of Forest Utilization and Management of Natural Production Forest upon non Development of Plantation Forest. Management of Natural Production Forest. Restructuring of Forest Industries. Curbing for Forest Administration System. Forest Area Securation. - Forest Nursery improvement. Management of National Park. Development of Natural Sanctuary Area NSA Controlling of Forest Fire. Pengelolaan keaneka ragaman hayati Biodiversity Penyusunan Rencana Kehutanan Drawing up of Pembangunan KPH Development of Forest Pengelolaan hutan lindung Management of Protection Pemanfaatan produk TSL dan jasa lingkungan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Kehutanan Sistem penunjang dan penerapan hasil litbang Pengembangan DIKLAT kehutanan Development of Pengembangan penyuluhan kehutanan Development of Standarisasi produk barang dan jasa kehutanan Pengelolaan DAS Water- shed River Basin Area RBA Rehabilitasi Hutan dan Lahan RHL Forest and Pengembangan hutan rakyat dan Hutan Tanaman Rakyat Pengembangan pemanfaatan HHBK Development of Non- Pengembangan daerah penyangga di sekitar Pengembangan RHL Swadaya Development of Pengembangan Hutan Kemasyarakatan Pembinaan hukum dan peraturan perundangan Desentralisasi kehutanan Forestry Decentralization. Pengembangan rencana dan penganggaran pembangunan Penguatan koordinasi dan sinkronisasi pembangunan Pengembangan pengelolaan keuangan Development Pengembangan urusan umum. Development of Pengembangan informasi kehutanan. Development of Pengembangan organisasi dan ketatalaksanaan. Pengembangan kerjasama Internasional dan perjanjian