The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology (ICOMSET 2015) Education, Mathematics, Science and

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

The International Conference on

Mathematics, Science, Education

and Technology

(ICOMSET 2015)

Edu ca t ion , M a t h e m a t ics, Scie n ce a n d

Te ch n ology for H u m a n a n d N a t u r a l

Re sou r ce s

October 22, 2015

Inna Muara Hotel and Convention Center

Padang, Indonesia

Organized by

Faculty of Mathematics and Science

State University of Padang

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

Organizing Committee

STEERI N G COM M I TTEE

Prof. Dr. Phil. H. Yanuar Kiram (Rector Universitas Negeri Padang)

Prof. Dr. H. Agus Irianto (Vice Rector I, Universitas Negeri Padang)

Prof. Dr. Lufri, M.Si (Dean Faculty of Mathematics and Science

Universitas Negeri Padang)

Dr. Yulkifli, S.Pd., M.Si (Vice Dean I, Faculty of Mathematics and Science

Universitas Negeri Padang)

ORGAN I ZI N G COM M I TTEE

Chairman

: Drs. Hendra Syarifuddin, M.Si., Ph.D

Vice Chairman : Ananda Putra, M.Si., Ph.D

Secretary

: Yohandri, M.Si., Ph.D

ED I TOR BOARD

Dr. Rahadi Wirawan, M.Si (Universitas Mataram)

Yuhendra, Ph.D (Institut Teknologi Padang)

Prof. Dr. Elizar (UNP)

Luhur Bayuaji, Ph.D (Universiti Malaysia Pahang)

Prof. Usman Sumo, Ph.D (Univ. Indonesia)

Dr. Jefri Marsal (Univ. Jambi)

Dr. Yosza Dasril (Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Malaka)

Prof. Josaphat Tetuko SS (Chiba University)

Prof. Dr. Festiyed, M.S (UNP)

Prof. Dr. Lufri, M.S (UNP)

Prof. Dr. Ahmad Fauzan, M.Pd, M.Sc (UNP)

Prof. Akrajas (UKM)

Prof. Hadi Nur (UTM)

Dr. Tan Ling Ling (Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia)

Prof. Wahyudin (UPI)

Prof. Akhmaloka (ITB)

Dr. Yuni Ahda, M.Si (UNP)

Prof. Dr. Syafrizal , M.Si (UNAND)

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

Contents

Messages

Rector of State University of Padang

Dean of Faculty of Mathematics and Science

Chairman of Organizing Committee

Keynote Speaker

BILL ATWEH

Socially Response-able Mathematics, Science and Technology Education:

Quality, Engagement, and Sustainability

ANDRIVO RUSYDI

New Paths For Half-Metallic And Ferromagnetic In Oxides

NUR HADI

The Design of Solid Catalysts: Some Examples from Universiti Teknologi

Malaysia

CHAN YEE KIT

A Millimeter-Wave GBSAR for Landslide Monitoring

ANANDA PUTRA

Novel Bacterial Cellulose With Well Oriented Fibrils Alignment: Synthesis and

Characterization

Mathematics Education

ADRI NOFRIANTO

Etnomathematics (Mathematical Concepts in Minangkabau Traditional Game)

AKRIM

The Integration of Sosial and Spiritual Competences Curriculum 2013 in Math

Subject in State Junior High School of Medan

ARNELLIS, SUHERMAN, DODI VIONANDA

Statistical Analysis of the Relationship Pedagogic and Professional Capabilities

Results Competency Test Teacher Senior High School West Sumatra Province

EDWIN MUSDI

Development of Mathematics Instructional Model Based on Realistic

Mathematics Education to Promote Problem Solving Ability Junior High

School Students of Padang

ELITA ZUSTI JAMAAN

Improving The Professional Competence of Elementary School Teacher

Through Programmed Training in Working Up A Student Sheet Based on

Critical and Matehematical Thinking in Pasaman Regency

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

HAFIZAH DELYANA

Improved Communication Mathematical Abilities Through Implementation The

Firing Line’s Strategy at VII Class of Junior High School

MARIAM NASUTION, RAHMATUL HAYATI, LATISMA

The Development of an Authentic Assessment in Geometric Subject which is

Oriented to Problem Based Learning (PBL)

PIPIT FIRMANTI

The Process of Deductive Thinking of Junior High School Students in

Completing Geometric Proof Based on Gender

RINA FEBRIANA

, YUSUTRIA

Analysis Validity LKM Based Contextual Algebra Basic In STKIP PGRI

Sumbar

ZETRIUSLITA, REZI ARIAWAN, HAYATUN NUFUS

Profile Ability Think Critically Student in Completing Mathematical Problems

Based on The Level of Academic Ability

ALI ASMAR

Development Constructivism Learning Materials Use Cooperative Model At

Fifth Class Of Elementary School

ISRA NURMAI YENTI, DONA AFRIYANI

A Need Analysis Of Material Development Of Qur’anic Integrative Calculus

LELY KURNIA

Modelling Of Factors Influencing The Student’s Academic Survival At Stain

Batusangkar

HANIFAH

Developing Calculus Learning Model Based On The Theory Of Apos (Action,

Process, Object, And Schema)

ANNA CESARIA, MERINA PRATIWI, DEWI YULIANA FITRI, RIZKY

ROSJANUARDI,SUFYANI

Self Evaluation Phase Define Basic Algebra Module Based On Inquiry

Sequence And Material Series

YUSMARNI

Improving The Second Year Students’ Activity and Learning Mastery Through

Realistic Mathematics Education Approach Atviii A ‘Class MTS N Olak

Kemang Jambi

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

Mathematics

ANISWITA

Fungsi Terintegral Henstock-Kurzweil Serentak dan Unifiomly Globally Small

Riemann Sums (UGSRS) dari Ruang Euclide Ke Ruang Barisan

HELMA, NONONG AMALITA

Estimation Actual Value Based On Output Value Tools Of A Measure Using

The Inverse Regression

HERU MAULANA, KUNTJORO ADJI SIDARTO

Valuing Employee Stock Options (ESO) Under Employee Forfeiture Rate

ROSLINA, HARTONO, MUHAMMAD ZARLIS

An Overview of Methods For Increasing The Performance of Genetic Algorithm

SRI WAHYUNINGSIH, RAHMAT GUNAWAN

Forecasting Oil Production Using Time Series Model

SYAMSUL ANWAR, LONNY AFRIZALMY

Optimization of Production Planning Using Goal Programming Method (A Case

Study in A Cement Industry)

DAHLAN ABDULLAH, HARTONO, ANGGA PRASETYA

Stock Parts Forecasting Using Least Square In Pt. Dunia Barusa Lhokseumawe

Physics Education

AHMAD FAUZI, FANNY RAHMATINA RAHIM, RATNA WULAN

The Effectiveness of Mechanics Handout Integrated by Volcanic Eruption

Material to Creative Thinking Ability

AMALI PUTRA

Physics Learning Oriented Content Complexity and Cognitive Process for

Improving Student Scientific Competence on High School in Padang

ASRIZAL, HUFRI, FESTIYED

Development of Authentic Assessment For Supporting The Inquiry Learning

Model in Basic Electronics 1 Course

MASRIL, HIDAYATI

Development of Teaching Materials Based on Scientific Approach For Support

The Implementation Of Curriculum 2013 in Senior High School

TANTI, MAISON

Modification of Colorado Learning Attitudes About Science Survey (Class)

HIDAYATI, FATNI MUFID, ELITA, FESTIYED

The Development Of Authentic Assessment For Problem Based Learning Model

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

In Learning Physics For Senior High School

SILVI YULIA SARI, HUSNA

The Effectiveness Of Constructivist-Based Handouts For Fundamental Of

Physics

Physics

AKMAM, IREFIA RD, SILVIA D, JEMMY ROHMANA

Optimition of Least Square Inversion Using Occam Method Dipole-Dipole

Geoelectric Resistivity Data for Landslide Surface Estimation

ARSALI, OCTAVIANUS CAKRA SATYA, SUPARDI

Determination of System Dynamic Characteristics Based on A Serial Rc Circuit

Model

FATNI MUFIT, MAHRIZAL, NOVIYENDRISUDIAR

Magnetic Properties and Heavy Metal Content of Leachate Sludge in Waste

Landfill, Air Dingin Padang, Indonesia

MAHRIZAL, AHMAD FAUZI, AKMAM

Monitoring Technology Development Geoelectric Time-Lapse to Monitor The

Prone to Landslides Areas in Padang Using Methods Geoelectric Time-Lapse

Resistivity Inversion In Wenner And Schlumberger Configuration

NOVIA LIZELWATI, VENNY HARIS

Design of Experiments Set to Determine The Coefficient of Kinetic Friction on

Collision of Two Objects

RATNAWULAN, JULIANSYAH, AHMAD FAUZI

Effect of Calcination Temperature on Phase Transformation and Crystallite Size

of Granite Powder

YULKIFLI, YOHANDRI, RAHMAT TRIYONO, ZULPADRIANTO

Development of 2D Vibration Detector Using Fluxgate Sensor Based on

Personal Computer

YENNI DARVINA, SUCI WAHYUNI, RAMLI

The Optimization Of Calcination Temperature Of Pensi (Corbicula Moltkiana)

Shells To Obtain Calcite-Caco3

YOHANDRI

A Synchronous Sub-Array Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna For Bisar

Onboard Uav

Chemistry Education

AFRAHAMIRYANO

Student’s Perception of Mathematics and Science Department of Biology

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

Education Program Toward Basic Chemistry Course at The University

Mahaputra Muhammad Yamin Solok

ANITA HERDA, RAYANDRA A, MAISON

Profile of Senior High School Student’s Needs for Life Skill Oriented –

Chemistry

BAYHARTI, SURYELITA, INDAH HARIA UTARI

The Development of Problem Based Learning Worksheet on Reaction Rate for

Senior High School Students

GUSPATNI

The Effect of E-Learning in Chemistry Learning Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

HARYANTO

Profiles Early Generic Skill Prospective Teacher of Chemistry in Jambi

University

LATISMA DJ

Design and Implementation of Chemistry Triangle Oriented Learning Media on

Hydrocarbons

RATULANI JUWITA

Developing Kit and Experiment Worksheet for Electrochemistry at XII Class of

Senior High School

YERIMADESI, BUDHI OKTAVIA, WILDA ZULVINA FITRI

The Development of Buffer Teaching Material In The Form of Module-Based

Discovery Learning for Chemistry in Senior High School

ZONALIA FITRIZA, LATISMA DJ, MAWARDI

Analysis Of Students Misconception of Atomic Structure In Sma Adabiah

Padang

ANDROMEDA, BAYHARTI, MENTARI DELIPUTRI

The Development Of Guided Inquiry-Based Worksheet For Laboratory Work On

Topic Of Colloidal System For Senior High School Instruction

Chemsitry

AMRIN, EDI NASRA

Trace Metals Accumulation in Vegetables From Some Areas in West Sumatera

ERPINA SANTI MELIANA NADEAK

Sodium – Diethyldithiocarbamate as A Complex Agent For Preconcentration and

Trace Analysis of Cd(II) Based on Flow Injection Analysis

INDANG DEWATA , EDI NASRA

Assessment of Trace Pb (II) in Sludge From Batang Anai River’s Padang

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

PUJI ARDININGSIH, LIA DESTIARTI, AFGHANI JAYUSKA

Isolation of Antibacterial Activities of The Endophytic Microbes From Asam

Kandis (

Garcinia Diocia Blume

)

RAHADIAN ZAINUL, ADMIN ALIF, HERMANSYAH AZIZ, SYUKRI

ARIF, SYUKRI

Photoelectrochemical Splitting Of Water By Photoelectric Induced At Carbon

Surface

SHERLY KUSUMA WARDA NINGSIH, MIFTAHUL KHAIR, SILVI

VERONITA

Synthesis and Characterization of ZnO Nanoparticles by Sol-Gel Method with

Various Additives

SRI BENTI ETIKA, SURYELITA, DEWI RAMADHANI

Isolation and Characterization of Flavonoid From Gambier Plant Leaves

(

Uncaria Gambir

R.)

SYAMSU HERMAN, AMUN AMRI

Synthesis of Copper Oxide Thin Film Via Sol-Gel Dip-Coating Route For

Spectrally Selective Absorber Material

ALIZAR ULIANAS

Biosensor As Food, Enviromental And Medical Controll

Biology Education

ANIZAM ZEIN

Use of Mind Map in Increasing Student Learning Activities and Results of

General Biology Course in FMIPA UNP Padang

ERNIE NOVRIYANTI, LUFRI

Developing Authentic Assessment for Contextual Teaching and Learning Model

at Animal Taxonomy Course

HEFFI ALBERIDA

Analyzing of Natural Science Teacher Understanding at Padang City About

Science Literacy, Problem Solving and Scientific Approach

M. HAVIZ

The Modern Instructional Design on Educational Research: How to Use the

Adaptive Systems on Instructional of Biology

MUHYIATUL FADILAH, HELENDRA, FITRI ARSIH

Identifying The Misconceptions Relate to Evolution Material Presented in

Students Biology Text Book For XII Class

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

RAHMAWATI D

Biology Education Student's Acceptance of Evolution Theory Before Learn

Evolutionary Course in Biology Department

RELSAS YOGICA, RISTIONO

Learning Style of First-Year Biology College Students in State University of

Padang

ZULMARDI, ARNELLIS, ARDI

Deepening Matter and Training for Competence Professional and Pedagogic

Teachers of Mathematics and Science at Junior and Senior High School

in District Dharmasraya of West Sumatra-Indonesia

SALVINA, LUFRI, ZULYUSRI

Contextual Approach Based On Lesson Study

On Biology Learning To Improve Cognitive Competencies Of VIII.3 Grade Of

MTsN Lubuk Buaya Padang Students

ZULYUSRI, RISTIONO, MEILA FETRI DARMA

Development Of Bilingual Module Nuance Contextual Approach Of Material

Movement Systems For Class VIII Students Of SMP

Biology

ARMEN

Fish Farming of Nila to Against The Population Reliance of Biological

Resources at Kerinci Seblat National Park (Tnks) in Nagari Limau Gadang

Lumpo, Pesisir Selatan

DES M, MORALITA CHATRI , ELI MATUSADIAH

Pollen Morphometry of Euphorbia Mili Moulins Varieties

FIFI YULIA. MAYA SARI

Management Analysis on Plants Morphology Lab Work in Basic Biology

Laboratory of Stain Batusangkar

GUSTINA, INDRIATI, RUTH RIZE PAAS MEGAHATI, ANNIKA MAIZELI

Identification of Amylase-Producing Bacteria From The Soil of Waste in Padang

MADES FIFENDY

Bacteriological Test Of Some Cooked Grinding Seasonings In The Pasar Raya

Padang

SYAMSU RIZAL

Tetra Primer-Arms-Pcr Construction to Detect Snp Rs290487 Tcf7l2

VIOLITA, TRIADIATY

Floristic Diversity, Abundance and Association of Tree Plant in Bukit 12

National Park Jambi.

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

YUNI AHDA, ELSA YUNIARTI AND JEFRI CHANDRA

TRP64ARG Adrenergic Reseptor ß-3 (ADRB3) GENE POLYMORPHISMS

ON TYPE 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients In Minangkabau Ethnics

Technology and Other

AL AL

,

SEPANUR BANDRI

1-Phase Inverter Trigger Pulse Control Design Based Arduino microcontroller in

The Hybrid Power Plant Regulator Systems

BUDI UTAMI FAHNUN, LELY PRANANINGRUM, WINOKO DAVID

CHRISTOFEL

Geographical Information System Handycraft Application Based on Mobile in

Depok City

CHOIRUL HUDA SUBARYANTO,

RENDY WIKRAMA WARDANA

The Technique Of Variable Projection and Rules of Temple Area in Operation of

Series

DEDY HARTAMA, JALALUDIN

Model Rules of Student Academic Achievement With The Algorithm C 4.5

ERWINSYAH SATRIA

Improving Students Activities and Learning Outcomes in Natural Science in

Class V by Using Somatic Auditory Visual Intellectual (SAVI) with Science Kit

Seqip in SD Negeri 25 Seroja Lintau

HASANUDDIN HENDRI NURDIN, WASKITO, SYAHRUL

Design and Contructions of Simple Distilations Unit With Reflux Column Model

For Cane Tibarau (

Saccarum Spontaneous Linn

) Bioethnol Productions

HENDRI NURDIN HASANUDDIN, IRZAL, PURWANTONO

Analysis of Behavior Deflection Composite Particle Board Cane Baggase Using

Adhesives Tapioca

LELYA HILDA, SYAFIRUDDIN, REPLITA

Integrated Farming, Creating Zero Waste Environment

RINA SUGIARTI, ANITA WASUTININGSIH, EGA HEGARINI

Geographic Information System Web-Based on Creative Industry in West

Sumatera

SALMAINI S

Development Of Mathematics Instructional Model Based Assisted Contextual Ict

In High School

SYUHENDRI

Physics Education Students’ Conceptions On Active Forces and Action-Reaction

Pairs

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

Message

from the

Rector of State University of Padang

Ladies and Gentlemen,

It give me great happiness to extend my sincere and warm welcome to the

participants of the International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and

Technology (ICOMSET 2015). On behalf of Universitas Negeri Padang, let me

welcome all of you to the conference in Padang, West Sumatra Province, Indonesia.

We believe that from this scientific meeting, all participants will have time to discuss

and exchange ideas, findings, creating new networking as well as strengthen the

existing collaboration in the respective fields of expertise. In the century in which the

information is spreading in a tremendous speed and globalization ia a trend.

Universitas Negeri Padang must prepare for the hard competition that lay a head.

One way to succeed is by initiating and developing collaborative work with many

partners from all over the world. Through the collaboration in this conference we can

improve the quality of our researches as well as teaching and learning process in

mathematics, science and technology.

I would like to express my

sincere appreciation to FMIPA UNP and organizing

committee who have organized this event. This is a great opportunity for us to be

involved in an international community. I would also like to extend my appreciation

and gratitude to keynote speakers and participants of this conference for their

contribution to this event.

Finally, I wish all participants get a lot of benefits at the conference. I also wish all

participants can enjoy the atmosphere of the city of Padang, West Sumatra.

Thank you very much

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

Message

from the

Dean of Faculty of Mathematics and Science

State University of Padang

Rector of State University of Padang

Vice-Dean of Faculty, Mathematics and Science

Head of Department in Faculty of Mathematics and Science

Distinguished Keynote Speakers

Organizers of this conference

Dear participants

Ladies and gentlemen

I am delighted and honored to have this opportunity to welcome you to ICOMSET

2015 - the International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and

Technology, which is hosted by Faculty of Mathematics and Science, State

University of Padang.

As the Dean of Faculty of Mathematics and Science, I wish to extend a warm

welcome to colleagues from the various countries and provinces. We are especially

honored this year by the presence of the eminent speaker, who has graciously

accepted our invitation to be here as the Keynote Speaker. To all speakers and

participants, I am greatly honored and pleased to welcome you to Padang. We are

indeed honored to have you here with us.

The ICOMSET organization committee and also the scientific committee have done

a great work preparing our first international conference and I would like to thank

them for their energy, competence and professionalism during the organization

process. For sure, the success I anticipate to this conference will certainly be the

result of the effective collaboration between all those committees involved.

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

I would like to take this opportunity to express my gratitude to all delegates and

sponsors for their full support, cooperation and contribution to the ICOMSET 2015. I

also wish to express my gratitude to the Organizing Committee and the Scientific

Committee for their diligence. The various sponsors are also thanked for their kind

support.

In closing, I realize that you are fully dedicated to the sessions that will follow, but I

do hope you will also take time to enjoy fascinating Padang, with its tropical setting,

friendly people and multi-cultural cuisine.

I wish the participants a very fruitful and productive meeting and with that. Finally,

we respectfully request the Rector of State University of Padang to open the

ICOMSET 2015 officially.

Thank you,

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ICOMSET 2015 The International Conference on Mathematics, Science, Education and Technology

Conference Timetable

Message

from the

Chairman of Organizing Committee

Firstly, I would like to say welcome to Padang Indonesia. It is an honor for us to host

this conference. We are very happy and proud because the participants of this

conference come from many countries and many provinces in Indonesia.

Ladies and gentlemen,

This conference facilitates researchers to present ideas and

latest research findings that allows for discussion among fellow researchers. Events

like this are very important for open collaborative research and create a wider

network in conducting research.

In this conference, there are about 120 papers that will be discussed from various

aspects of mathematics, science, technology, education and other related topics.

For all of us here, I would like to convey my sincere appreciation and gratitude for

your participation in this conference.

Thank you very much

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ETNOMATHEMATICS (MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS IN MINANGKABAU

TRADITIONAL GAME)

Adri Nofrianto

Mathematics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Science Sekolah Tinggi Keguruan dan Ilmu Pendidikan YDB Lubuk Alung

adrinofrianto@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to explore mathematical concepts that can be developed by playing a minangkabau traditional game. The game that is observed in this study is a stick game (main lidi or cimene). This game is played by children in age of 5 until 14 years old. The primary concern of this paper is algebra concepts. It can develop number senses, basic counting principle such as addition and multiplication, placing value, and basic symbols. The side findings are it can develop children’s character and children Scientifics culture. Furthermore, this paper will provide a new insight in “cimene” game to Minangkabau society and it also give the opportunity to save the traditional games from extinction.

Index terms – etnomathematics, mathematical concepts, minangkabau traditional game, character, scientifics

culture.

1.INTRODUCTION

Mathematics is human activity[1]. It has two

meanings. First, people have to experience to construct mathematics idea. They are required to involve actively in constructing mathematics concepts. Second, mathematics exists in human activity. Everyday activities involve mathematics. There is mathematics in transactions in the market, in constructing a building, in tailoring clothes, in bathing, games and many others human activity. This activity has repeated so many times and some activity has become cultures.

This reality encourages the researcher to understand and learn about mathematics concepts that can be developed in a game. The game that is chosen is a Minangkabau traditional games that is played since years ago. However, the culture changes have led to the era where children do not play the game as many as it is played a few years ago. It is a games that utilized sticks as the main tool.

According to Glorin; Ascher [2] Etnomathematics

is the study of mathematical practices of specific cultural group and the course of dealing with environmental problems and activities. It means that etnomathematics is the study that related to mathematics concept, mathematical activities and mathematics behavior that is used, done and exist in one culture. Cultures is a setrt of norms, beliefs, and values that are common to a group of people who belong to same ethnicity[2].

This study is aim to explore the mathematical concepts that is recited in sticks games. It also aims to provide a new insight in “cimene” game to Minangkabau society and to guarantee the continuity of this traditional game.

2.STICK (LIDI/CIMENE) GAME

Sticks game (play lidi/cimene) is a game that used sticks as the main objects. It uses hundreds of sticks which have two or three different lengths. The length represents the different value of each stick. The shortest sticks represent the smallest value and the longestone represents the highest value. The value of the stick is given by players before they begin to play as an agreement. In other word, there arepossibilities that the sticks will be valued differently in different game.

Sticks game is played by children of age 5 until 14 years old. It can be played by two, three, four and many players. This game also can be played by group. The complete description of the game will be described as follows:

a. There are at least two player

b. There arehundreds of shortest sticks, tens of middle sticks and 1-5 the longest sticks.

c. The player determines the value of each different length of sticks. The shortest can be valued1, 2,3,.., 10,…,100, the middle length can be valued, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, and the longest can be valued 10, 100, 1000,…. However, the shortest always get the smallest value and the longest always get the highest value.

d. The player holds all of sticks in the hand with a certain height and let it go.

e. The player collect the sticks one by one without touching other than stick that he/she wants to collect. In collecting the stick, eventhough the player does not touch a stick and the stick is

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moving or shaken, it is considered that he/she failed.

f. The player counts their sticks and their score. g. The scores are accumulated in each turn

h. The player that gets the highest score will be announced as the winner of the game.

The primary concern is to observe the mathematical concepts that can be developed by children throughout playing the game.

3. MATHEMATICAL CONCEPT 3.1Numbers senses

Numbers trigger young children’s interest. The everyday activities became the best media for learning processes.Children in early age has introduced to numbers by people around them. A age four, most of children can count until ten. However, they do not introduce any sign of each numbers. In several cases, when children talk about numbers the made several mistakes such as they cannot determine the value of each number, they get confuse to choose which one is greater between 6 and 7, and irregularity in counting (1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 5).

In order to help young children to understand numbers in a sense, adult tends to use fingers as real objects that represent numbers. In this situation sticks in sticks games can be used as real objects in introducing the numbers sense to young children.

In playing a game, young children can see the number of sticks that they obtained (we focused in sticks that valued as 1). They count the sticks by themselves. They know how many sticks that represent a number. In the end, children can reach a sense what numbers really is, what they represents.

3.2Addition

As the rule of the game said that players can determine the value of each different length of sticks, it creates an opportunity to children to learn about addition. It happens when player count their sticks. For example, when the player decided to value the shortest sticks as 1, the middle sticks as 5 and the longest sticks as 10, then the can learn addition of 1, 5, and 10.

1+1+1+1+….+1+5+5+…+5+10+10 5+5+…+5+1+1+1….+1+10+10

There are many combination that can done by the children. Moreover, the difficulties of the addition processes are increase when the player valued with others numbers.

This informal situation will sharpen children addition ability. Since children experiences by

themselves the addition activities, it will help them to understand the concept of addition.

3.3 Multiplication

Multiplication is one of basics concepts of algebra that need to be learn by students. It is a bridge to learn others concepts such as division, multi-digit multiplication, fractions, and ratios. It is really important to students in understand multiplication concept such that they can overcome any difficulty in the next lesson.

Mathematics concepts are related one to another. According[3]the instruction of multiplication starts

when children have mastered the basic additions and subtraction skills.

Introducing multiplication to students begins by introducing the idea of add so many times[4]. This

condition can be supported when the student play this games. In sticks game, add the value of the sticks as many as the number of sticks that they have. For example, if a player gets eight of shortest sticks (valued by 5), three of middle sticks (valued by 10) and one of the longest sticks (valued by 50), it can be count as follows:

First method

5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 = 40 10 + 10 + 10 = 30

50

40 + 30 + 50 = 120

or he can count as (second method)

8 × 5 = 40 ,3 × 10 = 30, 1 × 50 = 50

40 + 30 + 50 = 120

or he does the processes of counting in his mind (third method)

5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 120. Whatever the method of counting that is used, it happens during the games. This situation gives players togain new experiences in counting. By assimilating the knowledge that they have with the new knowledge, they come to new conclusion.

The sticks played its role as real object that representing a number (a group of objects 1) and the children will count the number of object 1). They count the number by adding so many times until they get their result. It leads to multiplication concept that is used by other players.

In conclusion, sticks game can be used to introduce children to multiplication concepts. It can happen naturally without intervention of unnecessary effort that lead to force children to understand the concept as the teacher believe what it really is.

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3.4Placing value

There are three different kinds of sticks based on length. Every stick represents different values. Learning from the fact that the valued of one sticks can be replaced by some sticks, it provide a new insight of the game. The player can learn about placing value where the value of one stick is equal to several sticks. Let’s takes an example of this case. We assume that the shortest stick is valued as 1, the middle length of stick is valued as 10, and the longest stick is valued by 100. From this three sticks children/player can learn that 1 of middle lengths sticks is equal to 10 of shortest sticks and 1 of longest sticks is equal to 10 middle length sticks or 100 shortest sticks. It will provide a new knowledge to player that each number has their own place in number system.

Since players are free to decide the value of each stick, they have the opportunity to learn different value of numbers to others.

3.5Basic symbols

Among the mathematics concepts that can be developed by playing sticks games is the basic understanding of symbols. Symbol are used to communicated an idea. In several occasion, we create our own symbols and give definition what the meaning of the symbols. For example, in English the symbols for area is A. However we used L as the symbols of Area. There are many cases that we define a symbol to communicate an idea. Another example is letter 𝑥𝑥 that is used differently in different cases. It represents different meaning. Since it is used to communicate an idea, we define the meaning of 𝑥𝑥

before we use it such that our audiences understand the topic.

Therefore, I argue that symbols are created by people but people get confuse with the symbols themselves. It is really important to look back to the nature of symbol. Symbols are created to help people communicate their idea. Symbols are a set of unrecognized figure that need to be remember. Symbols should be understood by the users.

Based on this believe, sticks games can be used to introduce the basic understanding of symbols. Players make the rule. They valued the sticks and sticks itself become symbols to the player. If the players decided the valued of shortest stick is 5, the shortest stick become the symbols of 5. As the game played so many times and the sticks become symbols for many numbers. Through the experiences, children will come to a sense that one sticks can represent many numbers and its depend on the first definition that the give to the stick. It comes to the sense that one symbols can have different meaning, it depends on the context the symbol that is used.

4.SCIENTIFIC CULTURE 4.1Careful observation

Winning is the goal of playing games. In order to win in sticks game, player must collect the higher score. Higher score will be achieved when the player can collect amount of sticks. Every player will try to collect the longest sticks as much as possible since it has higher value.

As game is played, the difficulties of collecting sticks increase consistently. Player needs to be careful to collect the sticks.

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

Figure 1 shows that a player try to collect the sticks, he try to collect the easiest part first. As in the picture 4.1.2, player comes to face difficult situations. He should observe the position of the stick such that others sticks do not shaken when he execute the plan.

The player should consider the position of stick. He also makes prediction what will happen to sticks around it. It required a careful observation and thorough investigation. When he fails to analyze the situation, the player loses his opportunity to get extra score.

4.2Decision making

Every player encounters different problems in every turn that they have.It creates an opportunity to develop students problem solving. The first step to solve the problem is to do an observation. The second step is analyzing the structure of stake of sticks. The third step they need to decide which stick that will be taken, how to do it, and what method that will be used.

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When children do this activity so many times and experience it by themselves, it will develop their problem solving ability. They learn what should be done before taking a decision. They learn to evaluate their work. They learn from mistakes. Finally, they learn to overcome their disappointment.

5. CHARACTER BUILDING

The stake of sticks is very unstable. Players should focus on the sticks. Every player that take turn can deceive other players since it is possible that the sticks only shake a little such other player could not see it. Therefore, every player should honest to themselves and other players. They must admit every mistake that they do during the games.

There are consequences for players that lie to others. It is often that the player who cheats will be disqualified. Other punishments for cheated player are losing one or two his turn, all sticks that he gets are not counted or forcing to quit the games. These punishments teach young children that dishonest are wrong act. They also learn that there are consequences for wrong acts.

6.CONCLUSION

This paper provides a new insight that traditional game is not just a game. It is full of mathematical concepts, lesson and values. These games can be used to develop several mathematical concepts, scientific culture, and children character. It will be challenging to develop a learning instruction that utilize this game.

REFERENCES

[1] Freudenthal, Hans. (2006). Revisiting mathematics education: China lectures (Vol. 9): Springer Science & Business Media.

[2] Yusuf, MW, Saidi, I, & Halliru, A. (2010). Ethnomathematics (A Mathematical game in the Hausa culture). International Journal of Mathematical Science Education, 3(1), 36-42. [3] Kroesbergen, Evelyn H, & van Luit, Johannes EH.

(2002). Teaching multiplication to low math performers: Guided versus structured instruction. Instructional Science, 30(5), 361-378.

[4] Van Den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja. (2001). Children learn mathematics: Freudenthal Institute, Utrecht University Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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THE INTEGRATION OF SPIRITUAL AND SOCIAL COMPETENCIES ON

CURRICULUM 2013 IN MATH SUBJECT IN STATE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL OF

MEDAN

Akrim

Muhammadiyah University of North Sumatera Jl. Kapten muchtar Basri No. 3 Medan

Akrim_umsu@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this research is to find integration model of spiritual and social competencies contained in the lesson planning, implementation of learning, and assessment of learning, especially in mathematics in the first grade of

junior

high school (VII SMP) which is able to integrate spiritual and social competencies while inserting the competence of knowledge and skills in it. In the field, the researchers found some things that hinder the integration of the two competencies, namely the teachers still do not fully understand how the planning that is integrated with core competence (KI) 1 and core competence (KI) 2, the learning model used in the learning process does not yet support the process of forming the character of the students. Similarly, in giving exercise, the teacher does not insert spiritual and social values in essay test and just sticking with multiple choice questions.

The Integration of spiritual and social value in learning is very dependent on the learning model that corresponds to the

characteristics

of learning materials. It can be applied if teachers choose the PAIKEM learning (active learning, innovative, creative, effective and fun) such as problem-based learning, project-based learning, inquiry learning and discovery learning). The assessment of spiritual and social competencies should be carried out through the observation, inter-students assessment, self-assessment and teacher’s journal. Therefore, teachers need to make a rubric of attitude assessment expressed qualitatively..

Index term: Competence, Spritual and Social, curriculum 2013

1. INTRODUCTION

Curriculum is a set of plans and arrangements regarding the objectives, content and learning materials and methods used as guidelines for the organization of learning activities to achieve certain educational purpose (Depdiknas, 2006: 449). Curriculum regulates how the implementation of learning in the classroom, and therefore the curriculum is a reference for teachers in determining the learning materials and the appropriate methods that can be applied to achieve educational goals. In order to enhance the quality of education in Indonesia for the better, the government has made several changes of curriculum in accordance with the reality of the situation existing education. As with phenomena which recently befell the world of education in Indonesia, where many cases occurred unscrupulous performed by students ranging from elementary to high school level, has forced the government especially Dekdikbud (Department of Education and Culture) to establish a curriculum that emphasizes the cultivation of spiritual and social values on the learners, that is Curriculum 2013.

According to Nuh M. (2012), Minister of Education and Culture, the implementation of Curriculum 2013 aims to correct the behavior and character of the learners so that cases such as fights, sexual harassment, bullying, violence, among adolescents can be minimized. Curriculum 2013,

which emphasizes on education that integrates spiritual and social competencies and of course without losing the cognitive and psychomotor competencies is a perfect solution to resolve the crisis of morals and character education. On the Curriculum 2013, the perpetrators of good education is the principal, teachers, and students have to integrate the spiritual and social competence in all subjects in school. In other words, in each of the learning process, students not only will have the competencies of knowledge (cognitive) and skills (psychomotor), but also spiritual and social competence. However, it was later raised concerns in the minds of educators will be their inability to apply the spiritual and social competence in specific subjects such as Mathematics, Science and others.

Polemic pros and cons of the implementation of the curriculum 2013 that occurred in the community has inspired researchers to conduct research regarding the application of curriculum 2013 in mathematics at some junior high school in the city of Medan, to know the deficiencies of curriculum 2013 that occur in the field whether it is derived from human resources as teachers, as well as learning devices. Furthermore, from the results of the investigation, researchers will design the integration pattern of spiritual and social competence in process of lesson planning, the implementation of learning, and assessment of learning and also develop Math textbook, for the first

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grade of Junior High School which integrate spiritual and social competence with knowledge and skills in it. The implementation of curriculum 2013 in the city of Medan is started simultaneously in the academic year 2014, so the results of this study are expected to be a good evaluation for teachers, principals and government in the development of curriculum 2013.

2. REVIEW OF LITERATURE 2.1Curriculum 2013

Curriculum is the heart of education where the materials, processes, content and learning objectives determined by it. According to Nasution (1995), the curriculum is a number of subjects at school or lectures in university that must be taken to achieve a level. The same thing also expressed by UNESCO (2004: 13),

which

states that "Curriculum is what is learned and what is taught (context); how it is delivered (teaching-learning methods); how it is assessed (exams, for example); and the resources used (eg, books used to deliver and support teaching and learning) ". Studies in several countries in Asia, Europe and the USA (David L.Grossman, Wing On Lee and Kerry J. Kennedy, eds., 2008) suggests that the policy on the school curriculum is closely linked to the interests of national education policy and situation as well as context that supports it. Therefore, a curriculum change in a country can be caused by the need of education situation is happening.

Curriculum should give attention to the whole

sphere

that is not only focused on the cognitive, psychomotor or affective only. Competence curriculum that is able to integrate spiritual, social, cultural and cognitive competence in line with the character and competence of psychomotor course will produce a civil and dignified man. This is in accordance with the formulation of the human quality of Indonesia in the National Education Goals set forth in Law No. 20 of 2003 on National Education System:

National education serves to develop the ability and

character

development as well as the civilization of dignity in the context of the intellectual life of the nation, aimed at developing students' potentials in order to become a man of faith and fear of God Almighty, noble, healthy, knowledgeable, capable, creative, independent and become citizens of a democratic and responsible.

Curriculum 2013 is a new curriculum proposed by the

Ministry

of Education and Culture of the Republic of Indonesia to replace the Education Unit Level Curriculum (Curriculum 2006). Curriculum 2013 is a curriculum that promotes understanding, skills and character education. Students regulate on the material, active in discussions and presentations as well as having good manners discipline.

2.2 Core Competence and Basic Competence 2.2.1 Core Competence (KI)

Core Competence cannot be equated with Competency Standards (SK). If SK in the KTSP (Education Unit Level Curriculum) is taught to students, the core competency is not to be taught, but to be formed through learning process. Every subject must be submitted to the core competencies that have been formulated. In other words, all the subjects that are taught and learned in the classroom should contribute to the formation of core competence.

The core competence serves as organizing element of basic competence. As an organizing element, core Competence is a binder for the vertical and horizontal organization of basic competency.

Vertical

organization

of

Basic Competence is the link between the the Basic Competence content of class or level of education to a level above that meet the principles of learning in which there is a continuous accumulation of the content learned. Horizontal organization is the link between the Basic Competence content of the subject with the Basic Competence content of different subjects in the weekly meetings and the same class so that a process of mutually reinforcing can happen.

According to the Ministry of Education and Culture (2013),

designed

core competencies in four inter-related groups, namely:

a. Core Competence 1 (related to the spiritual attitude)

In this religious competence, students can be judged on the following charges: a) Obedience worship, b) Conduct of gratitude, c) Pray before and after the activity, d) Tolerance in worship. b. Core Competence 2 (related to social attitude)

In this social competence, the attitudes which can be observed : a) Honest, b) Discipline, c)

Responsibility

, d) polite, e) Caring, f) Confident, and the other attitudes according to its competence in learning, for example: cooperation, thoroughness, perseverance, and others.

c. Core Competence 3 (related to knowledge) Knowledge competence is divided into several basic competencies that depend on the subjects and the

learning

material at a certain level. d. Core Competence 4 (related to skill).

The forms of skill Competence are result of students’ works, students' performance, project, portfolio, and others.

The four groups are the reference of basic competencies and should be developed in every learning

activity

integratively. Competences that relates to religious and social attitudes are developed indirectly (indirect teaching) when students learn about knowledge (core competence 3) and skill (core competence 4).

2.2.2. Basic Competence (KD)

In supporting core competencies, learning -outcomes of a subject are explained into basic competencies. The achievement of core competence

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is obtained through learning basic competence conveyed

through

subjects. The formulation is developed by taking into account the characteristics of learners, initial capabilities, as well as the characteristics of a subject. As a supporter of the achievement of core competencies, basic competencies are grouped into four according to the formula that supports core competencies, namely: a. Basic competence group of spiritual Attitude

(supporting core competence-1) or group 1

b. Basic competence group of social attitudes (supporting core competence-2) or group 2

c. Basic competence group of knowledge (supporting core competence-3) or group 3

d. Basic competence group of skills (supporting core competence-4) or group 4.

The description of basic competence is to ensure that the achievements of the learning does not stop until the knowledge alone, but must continue to skills, and comes down to attitude. Through the core competence, each subject is emphasized not only to contain the knowledge, but also includes content that is useful to the process of skill formation. It also contains a message about the importance of understanding these subjects as part of the formation of attitudes. The ongoing process is to ensure that knowledge continues to

skill

and empties to attitude so that there is a close relationship between basic competence of knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

2.3 Lesson Plan of Curriculum 2013

Lesson Plan is a work plan that describes procedures, organizing, learning activities to achieve the basic competencies that have been established which have been outlined in the syllabus. Lesson plan most scope covers the basic competencies that comprise one) indicator or several indicators for one session or more. A teacher must pay attention to the steps the preparation of lesson plan. in Curriculum 2013 is divided into three major steps, preliminary activities, core activities and closing activities. Before preparing lesson plans, there are some things you should know:

a. Lesson plan is derived from the syllabus for directing the activities of learners in order to achieve basic competency. Every teacher in the educational unit Lesson Plan obliged to prepare a complete and systematic.

b. Lesson plan are prepared for every basic competence which can be implemented in one meeting or more.

c. The teacher designed a fragment of the Lesson Plan for each meeting tailored to scheduling in the education unit.

Components of lesson plan in Curriculum 2013 consists of: 1) Identification of Subjects, 2) Basic Competence, 3) Achievement Indicators Competence, 4) The learning objectives, 5) Teaching materials, 6) Allocation of time, 7) Method of learning, 8) learning

activities, 9 ) assessment of learning outcomes, 10) learning resources

2.4 The Implementation of Learning in Curriculum 2013

Learning is an effort to create a climate and services on the ability, potential, interests, talents, and needs of diverse learners to enable the optimal interaction between teachers and students, and between students and students. The Ministry of Education

and

Culture (2013) stated that there are several steps that can be implemented in learning through the curriculum in 2013 in general, namely:

2.4.1. Learning Model in Curriculum 2013

The learning model can be defined as a conceptual framework that

describes

a systematic procedure in organizing learning experiences to achieve specific learning objectives, and serves as a guideline for the designers of learning and teachers in planning and implementing learning activities. According Kemdikbud, there are several models of learning that are relevant to the curriculum in 2013, among others:

a. Discovery Learning Model

Discovery learning is one of learning model developed and implemented in curriculum 2013. Discovery learning refers to various instructional design models that engages students in learning through discovery. Teachers as main implementers of learning is certainly obliged to understand and apply this learning model. Discovery learning model has some learning steps, namely: preparation, implementation, and assessment. In main activities, the implementation of discovery learning include stimulation, statement (problem identification), data collection, data processing, verification (evidence) and drawing conclusions (generalizations).

b. Problem-based Learning Model

Problem-based learning is a teaching method in which students learn about a subject through the experience of solving a real problem. It is a format that simultaneously develops both problem solving strategies and disciplinary knowledge bases and skills by placing students in the active role of problem-solvers confronted with an ill-structured situation that simulates the kind of problems they are likely to face as future managers in complex organizations. Learning steps in problem-based learning consist of basic concepts, problems definition, independent learning, and knowledge exchange.

c. Project-based Learning Model

Project-based learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and

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respond to an engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. Teacher assigns students to carry out exploration, appraisal, interpretation, synthesis, and finding information to produce various forms of learning outcomes. This learning model has six learning steps, namely: 1) the determination of the question, 2) drawing up project plans, 3) scheduling, 4) monitoring, 5) testing results, and 6) Experience-evaluation. Assessment system conducted on the project –based learning is the project assessment. Every project (task) will be assessed based on students’ ability in finishing it within a predetermined time.

2.4.2 Assessment in Curriculum 2013

a. Characteristics of Assessment

Assessment in Curriculum 2013 has the following characteristics: 1. Completed study, 2. Authentic, 3. Continuous 4. Using valuation techniques varied, 5. Based on the reference of criterion. According to the Ministry of Education and Culture (2013), the assessment of Spiritual and Social competency is done through:

b. Observation

It is an assessment technique conducted continuously using the senses, either directly or indirectly by using observation format that contains a number of behavior indicators observed. This is done during lessons and outside learning

c. Self-Assessment

It is an assessment technique conducted by asking learners to express their own weakness and superiority in the achievement of competence. d. Peer Assessment

It is an assessment technique done by asking learners to assess each other related to attitudes and daily behavior of the learners.

e. Journal of Teacher’s Notes

It is a teacher’s record inside and outside the classroom which contains information on the results of observations about the strengths and weaknesses of students related to their attitudes and behavior. f. Knowledge

Knowledge aspect can be assessed in several ways, namely: a) written test, b) Oral test, c) Assignment

g. Skills

Aspects of skills can be assessed in several ways, namely: a) Performance, b) Project, c) Portfolio.

3. RESEARCH METHODS 3. 1 Research Approach

This study is developmental research that aims to develop educational products and test the effectiveness of the

product

. This research was conducted for 2 years where the first year, researchers conducted an investigation of the problems that occur in the field related to the implementation of the curriculum 2013 mainly related to how the teacher pours spiritual and social competence in mathematics in the first year of junior high school. The results of these investigations became the basis for researcher to design a integration model of spiritual and social competencies in mathematics in the planning process, the learning process and assessment. In addition, in the second year of this research, the researcher will develop the mathematics textbook which supports the integration of spiritual and social competencies into knowledge and skill competencies.

3. 2 Research Location

The research was conducted at several schools of Junior High School in the city of Medan that use the curriculum 2013, namely SMPN 1, SMPN 34 and SMPN 38 Medan.

3. 3 Research Procedures

The procedures of the reasearch are shown in the following figure:

Identification of

problem and need

Designing

the product

Validating

the product

Revising the

Product (I)

Experimenting in the

field

Revising the

Product (II)

Product tested

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4. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 4.1 Integration of Spiritual and Social Values on

Curriculum 2013 Mathematics of Junior High School.

As already described in the literature review in the third section, Law Number 20 year 2003 about National Education System, learning activities, beside to make students are able in competing that had targeted, not only

that

but also the student taught so that the students know, realize, care, and internalize to do the behavior realizely or not, the student will do it with happily in their daily life and their social life.

To grow up the spiritual values and social are integrated in learning process such us introduce values gotten realizely about the important values life, and internalize values into the behavior of students daily

through

a learning process , moreover when learn in the class and outside of the class, especially in mathematics. regarding with the aim of national education to improve the quality of education is directed to improve the quality of Indonesian human sources development through heart, mind, taste and exercise so that have a competitive edge to facing of global challenges. The relevancy of education to produce graduated according with indonesian need potential.

4.2 The Integration of Spiritual and Social Values in Planning of Mathematics Learning

Learning materials, learning activities, indicators of achievement competencies, appraisal, allocation of time, and learning resources are defined in the syllabus is basically intended to facilitate students master KI (core competence) or KD (basic competence). So that these components also facilitates learning can help students develop character, the

minimum necessary to adapt the components of learning activities, indicators of achievement of competencies, and assessment techniques from the syllabus. Addition or modification of learning activities, indicators of achievement and assessment techniques in the syllabus must pay attention to compliance with the Core Competence and Basic Competence relating to knowledge and skills.

As in the syllabus, in order that Lesson Plan may provide guidance to teachers in creating learning that has spiritual and social values, it is necessary to adapt to some of its

components

. Lesson Plan format that combines the knowledge and skills competencies with the spiritual and social competence can be found in the appendix. A blend of spiritual and social values needs to be facilitated and developed since the learning process is designed by Lesson Plan. It was, among others, can be done by making changes to the Lesson Plan following three components.

a. Addition or modify the learning activities in the Lesson Plan, as well as adding valuable words of spiritual and social formation of values in each learning activity so nuanced learning activities designed to develop spiritual and social competence

b. Addition or modify the indicators of achievement of competencies in the Lesson Plan primarily on basic competencies indicators related knowledge and skills, thereby ensuring indicators related to the achievement of spiritual and social competence.

c. Addition or modify the Lesson Plan assessment techniques on well with observations, self-assessment, peer assessment and journals consistently to develop and / or measuring the development of spiritual and social competence of students.

Figure 4.1 the Flow of Planning and Learning Process according to Standard Process.

Plan of Learning Process

- Syllabus

- Principle of syllabus

- Lesson Plan

- Principle of lesson plan Requirements for the Implementation of

Learning Process

Implementation of learning proccess

Opening Activity Main Activity Closing Activity Learning

Process

Observing (grateful, accurate, etc)

Reasoning (logic, creative ,innovative,et

) Collecting the

information (patient, accurate,

hard work, independent ,etc ) Asking

(curiosity, confidence ,

etc )

Communicate ( systematic, creative, innovative, etc)

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The integration of alternative spiritual and social competence that can be implanted and developed to students and progress on the word bold.

4.2.1. Opening activity

In opening activity, teacher:

a. prepare students psychologically and physically to follow the learning process;

b. ask questions to remaind the student about the lesson before continue the next lesson.

c. explain the purpose of learning or basic competenciesthat will be achieved;

In the opening activities, kinds of activities that can be done and the values of spiritual and social that can be implanted and developed include the following.

a. Teacher entered the classroom on time (discipline);

b. When the teacher entered the classroom, says greeting to the students (politely);

c. Pray before starting the lesson and pray for other students who are ill in order to get well (religiousness, careness);

d. Ensuring that every students come on time (discipline);

e. Give warn to students who come late politely (discipline, polite and careness)

f. Linking the material / competencies that will be learn with spiritual values and appropriate social. g. convey the scope of material and the description

explanation of activities according to the syllabus.

4.2.2. Main Activity

Main activity is learning process to achieve basic competence that will be done interactively, inspiratif, interesting, challenging, to motivate the students to take an active action, and giving enough chance and space for initiative, creativity, and antonomously based on their talent, max, physical progress and pshycologic’s students. This Main activity use according with students’s characteristics and the subject that can collect the information of observation process, asking, and communicating. a. Observing

In observing activity, the teacher asks the students independently to see and hear visual medial, audio and audiovisual about the topic / material’s theme they will learn by applying the principles of nature with praise of creation, grateful for the perfection of his creators (religious, grateful, self-contained, logical thinking, creative, curious);

b. Asking

Asking activity, the teacher facilitates the interaction between students and teachers, environment, and other learning resources politely and orderly (curious, cooperation, mutual respect);

c. Gathering information

In collecting information, the teacher:

1) facilitating students by giving assignments, discussions, and others to come up with new ideas both orally and in writing (creative, confident, critical, respectful, polite);

2) Provide an opportunity to think, analyze, solve problems and act without fear (creative, confident, critical);

3) facilitating learners in problem-based learning, project, search, discovery (cooperation, mutual respect, responsibility);

d. Reasoning

In reasoning activity, the teacher facilitates the students

analyze

the patterns of mathematics

closely

related to everyday problems (conscientious, creative, hard working, confident).

e. communicating

In communicating activity, teacher:

1) facilitate the students present written or oral with responsibility and confidence in learning outcomes, what they have learned, skills or materials that still need to be improved, or strategicies or new concepts were found based on what is learned. (responsibility, confidence, co-operation).

2) facilitate the presentation of the results of the students responded with courtesy and respect include give the question and answer session to confirm, denial and reason, give additional information, or complete the information or other responses. (courtesy, respect, critical thinking).

4.2.3. Closing Activity

Things that need to be taken to ensure that the integration of

spiritual

values and social can be more intensive is as follows:

a. beside the conclusions relating knowledge aspects, students should be facilitated to obtain a valuable moral lesson, learned from the knowledge and skill or through a learning process in the past.

b. Assessment not only measures the student achievement the knowledge and skills but also on the development of student character.

c. Feedback related to the product or process should involve both competence and character and begin with the positive aspects pointed by students to grow up self-reliance.

d. The students’ works are displayed to develop the mutual respect with other people's work and confidence.

e. Follow-up the activities remedial learning, enrichment programs, counseling services and provide good assignments individualy and group assignment given in order not only related to the development of intellectual ability but also personality ability.

f. Pray at the end of the lesson.

Figur

Figure 4.1 the Flow of Planning and Learning Process according to Standard Process.
Figure 4 1 the Flow of Planning and Learning Process according to Standard Process . View in document p.24
Figure 5.2. Integration Pattern of Spiritual and Social Competencies into Knowledge and Skill Competencies in planning, learning and assessing processes
Figure 5 2 Integration Pattern of Spiritual and Social Competencies into Knowledge and Skill Competencies in planning learning and assessing processes . View in document p.27
Figure 1
Figure 1 . View in document p.35
Table 4.3 Scores Mean pretest, posttest, and N- gain Mathematical Communication ability
Table 4 3 Scores Mean pretest posttest and N gain Mathematical Communication ability . View in document p.52
Table 1. The Grid of Closed Questionnaire to Students

Table 1.

The Grid of Closed Questionnaire to Students . View in document p.83
Table 1. Description of  Mathematics student’s 2008-2011 is based on the explanatory variables

Table 1.

Description of Mathematics student s 2008 2011 is based on the explanatory variables. View in document p.88
Table 4. Chi-Square Test

Table 4.

Chi Square Test . View in document p.89
Table 4. Logistic Regression Analysis Saturated Models

Table 4.

Logistic Regression Analysis Saturated Models . View in document p.90
Figure 1 Model of Learning Calculus Based on APOS Theory (Hanifah, 2015)

Figure 1.

Model of Learning Calculus Based on APOS Theory Hanifah 2015 . View in document p.96
Table 3: The influence of  volatility  to Expected

Table 3.

The influence of volatility to Expected . View in document p.126
Figure 1. Alpha Value Effect to the Performance of Genetic Algorithm

Figure 1.

Alpha Value Effect to the Performance of Genetic Algorithm . View in document p.130
Fig. 1  Flowchart of Genetic Algorithm [7]

Fig 1.

Flowchart of Genetic Algorithm 7 . View in document p.130
Figure 4.1. Simulation-1
Figure 4 1 Simulation 1 . View in document p.139
Figure 4.2. Simulation-2
Figure 4 2 Simulation 2 . View in document p.139
Table 2. Processing Cycle Time of  Cement Mills

Table 2.

Processing Cycle Time of Cement Mills . View in document p.142
Table 3 Cement Mill Capacity (2015) Working Total

Table 3.

Cement Mill Capacity 2015 Working Total . View in document p.143
Table 5. Estimated Cements Demand (2015)

Table 5.

Estimated Cements Demand 2015 . View in document p.143
Table 10.  The 4th Goal Achievement

Table 10.

The 4th Goal Achievement . View in document p.145
Table 11. The 4th Goal Achievement (Continued)

Table 11.

The 4th Goal Achievement Continued . View in document p.145
Table 8. The 1st Goal Achievement

Table 8.

The 1st Goal Achievement . View in document p.145
Table 9.  The 2nd and 3th Goal Achievement

Table 9.

The 2nd and 3th Goal Achievement . View in document p.145
Table 1. Data Stock Spare Part 2010 until 2014

Table 1.

Data Stock Spare Part 2010 until 2014 . View in document p.149
Figure 8. Form Main Menu

Figure 8.

Form Main Menu . View in document p.151
Figure 9. Form Input Data Location

Figure 9.

Form Input Data Location . View in document p.151
Figure 11. Form Input Data User

Figure 11.

Form Input Data User . View in document p.151
Table 1. Operational Work Activity Based on Knowledge Dimension & Cognitive

Table 1.

Operational Work Activity Based on Knowledge Dimension Cognitive . View in document p.161
Figure 2.Step-by-step preparation Content And Cognitive Processes in Planning

Figure 2.

Step by step preparation Content And Cognitive Processes in Planning . View in document p.162
Figure 3. Percentage Graph of Students According  Level Cognitive Process For Factual

Figure 3.

Percentage Graph of Students According Level Cognitive Process For Factual . View in document p.163
Figure 9. Graph of Proportion Percentage Completed  Knowledge Dimension In Teacher

Figure 9.

Graph of Proportion Percentage Completed Knowledge Dimension In Teacher . View in document p.164
Figure 10 graph of Proportion Completion Percentage  Level of Cognitive Processes in Teacher
Figure 10 graph of Proportion Completion Percentage Level of Cognitive Processes in Teacher . View in document p.164

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