Top PDF What Have We Learned from our Mistakes

What Have We Learned from our Mistakes

What Have We Learned from our Mistakes

decision, despite the conflict of interest. A recent study by Cain, Loewenstein, and Moore (2005) suggests that disclosure might not only fail to solve the problems created by conflict of interest but may sometimes make matters worse. In their experiment, subjects were randomly assigned the role of an advisor or an estimator. The estimators’ task was to guess the total value of a jar filled with coins; they were given 10 seconds to view the jar from a distance of 3 feet. Advisors were allowed more time and better viewing. Advisors gave their recommendations to estimators before estimators made their guesses. Estimators were always paid based on their accuracy, but advisor payments varied across conditions. In the control condition with no conflict of interest, advisors were paid if estimators guessed correctly. In the condition with conflict of interest and no disclosure, advisors were paid if estimators overvalued the jar, and estimators were not aware of the advisors’ incentives. In the condition with conflict of interest and disclosure, advisors were paid if estimators overvalued the jar, and estimators were aware of the advisors’ incentives.
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What have i learned from Babi Badalov.pd

What have i learned from Babi Badalov.pd

bourgeois take for granted and are bored by, talk of searching for food on the streets without money, wandering through police prefectures. The practices of migrants, their (my, our) interests in travelling, walking and moving through the same places, are quite different, because we feel, see and take an interest in what is happening in the towns from the waist up, while the eyes of Babi Badalov are fixed on the pavement, seeking posters, shreds of images and signs of civilization littering the street, and are fixed on the faces of the people of the metropolises, in which he is seasoned at reading what ethnic group they belong to and what distant part of the planet they come from. In 2014, migrant´s zōē is, unsurprisingly, subjected to total state control and depends on the state administrative practices of the apparatus judging and controlling migration. We can hardly expect that the control apparatus will lighten its surveillance; with the digitization of every sphere, surveillance becomes more effective. Life itself, not just deportation, but very life itself depends on something that in the pre – digital era looked like a round, red, purple or black ink seal, a stamp, the pound of soft rubber on the paper of a protocol, today it dissolves in a chain of decisions that have to be recorded in digital online forms, to which perhaps the entire state administration has access, and which are collectively evaluated at closed-session and committee meetings, and this system conducts biopolitical surveillance of health, skin, internal organs, mental state (Babi Badalov, My Life Report in Paris), nutrition and provision of a roof over the mortal coil. That is the Poe Z ōē material of Babi Badalov.
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LEARNING FROM WHAT OTHERS HAVE LEARNED F (1)

LEARNING FROM WHAT OTHERS HAVE LEARNED F (1)

We employed two dependent variables and esti- mated our models using panel regression methods appropriate to each dependent variable. All explan- atory and control variables were lagged one year, which accounted for the delay in converting inno- vation inputs into outputs, reduced concerns about reverse causality, and avoided simultaneity. The panel was unbalanced as some firms were acquired or restructured, making within-firm comparisons difficult. Our first dependent variable, innovative output, was a count variable that could take on only nonnegative integer values. The use of linear re- gression to model such data can result in ineffi- cient, inconsistent, and biased coefficient estimates (Long, 1997). Although Poisson regression is appro- priate to model count data, our data were signifi- cantly overdispersed, violating a basic assumption of the Poisson estimator (Hausman, Hall, & Grili- ches, 1984). Thus, we used negative binomial re- gression to model the count data (Hausman et al., 1984). The negative binomial model is a generali- zation of the Poisson model and allows for overd- ispersion by incorporating an individual, unob- served effect into the conditional mean (Hausman et al., 1984). We included year dummies to control for unobserved systematic period effects. We also employed firm fixed effects to control for unob- served, temporally stable firm differences in inno- vation. We used Allison and Waterman’s (2002) unconditional fixed effects estimator rather than the more conventional conditional maximum like- lihood estimation procedure developed by Haus- man et al. (1984). 3 However, our results do not
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Humanities 101 What I Have Learned From

Humanities 101 What I Have Learned From

themselves. It is little more than a continual privileging by the privileged. We have the answers because we have the degrees, but the people we are speaking about are finding answers in being who they are. The ever shifting reality of power and perspective within the classroom becomes quite noticeable when the most profound moments of the class stemmed from the students being truthful about who they were, and having the courage to share that information with the rest of us. It was the privileging of a different set of experiences and a different – and sometimes contradictory – sort of knowledge. It is an example of experience juxtaposed with the academic and the abstract. A few of the topics in the program did elicit a lot of interest, but being able to relate was always key. Gauged from the student’s engagement, a meaningful education is one about them, as few of them were going to be visiting churches in Europe anytime soon, and the topic isn’t as abstract and patronizing as being instructed to “claim your mind.” I think it
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What I have learned from Professor Pedro

What I have learned from Professor Pedro

Professor Funari is a voracious reader and writer. His long résumé is his trade mark, and we, students, have learned to admire it and to make it a goal of ours (obviously not reachable), when building our own academic career. With regard to that, he has definitely helped us and still does by way of the many publication opportunities he has given us in Boletim do Centro do Pensamento Antigo and in books he edited.

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What We Have Learned About Fighting Defe

What We Have Learned About Fighting Defe

For practitioners, the resulting list of statements represents a summary of what an influential sector of the software engineering community feels to be the current state of the knowledge in an important area, defect reduction. It shows that there are some underlying principles of software development that tend to hold across development environments and problem domains, and begins to identify some of the important factors that can cause results to vary from one project to another. For example, several statements described evidence that increased process maturity affects the results of software development in a positive way (e.g. Item 2.1, which said that effort spent on avoidable rework decreases as process maturity increases). Such statements can be useful for benchmarking (comparison of a particular project to what is known in general) and decision-making (summarizing what can be expected from software development in general).
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What I have learned in Comparative gover

What I have learned in Comparative gover

sovereignty, democracy, authoritarian regime, state, nation, and regimes, presidential system and tolatalitarian is very interesting to learn. Comparative government is a interesting and fun to learn Major though im not good at it but honestly I enjoyed learning it so well. Thanks to Our dearest My Luzon in a sense that beside to the learning’s I have learned in the subject I also learned the how to or what about being a Teacher. Maam inspire me as well how to be a good teacher, and how to mingle, treat and show respect with my students oneday. To the teacher that teaches us and inspires me, May she continue to spread and impart her knowledge,and a role model teacher to her students and dedicated good teacher. We’re so blessed to have her.Me as student would like to give her great gratitude, pleasure and privilege.
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Assessment for Learning What have we lea

Assessment for Learning What have we lea

contributions to this workshop); and we have tried to account for these problems. Yet, the most important issue that we have learned from our work and discussions is that assessment, like any other aspects of pedagogy, does not stand alone. It is embedded within ‘webs of significance’ (Geertz, 1973, p. 5) that are spun around wider human interests and processes (e.g. EC conceptions of ‘E-learning’, ‘tomorrow’s education’ and the ‘Bologna process’).

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Who Gets Radicalized What I learned from

Who Gets Radicalized What I learned from

Eventually, Salafis fracture population. This is a tipping point in their radicalization effort. It destabilizes regions and devalues billions of dollars we invest to build socially cohesive nations. Our response to them is an engineered military attack, but that alone, without a more adept strategy to re-capture radicalized youths around the globe, only pushes these at-risk populations to societal peripheries where Salafis wait to embrace them.

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What I Have Learned of Light A Poetics o (1)

What I Have Learned of Light A Poetics o (1)

This paper is inspired by the significance of light in Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity, both special and general, and the corresponding impact of Einstein’s thought on how we see the universe and our place in it. Light, as a concept and a phenomenon, can be richly discussed on both literal and figurative levels. My aim is to investigate the intersections between the poetics and physics of light, paying special attention to poetic metaphors, symbols, and imagery concerning the nature and uses of light. I emphasize the sonnet, whose familiar fourteen-line, iambic pentameter structure is immensely suited to its purpose, which is to argue or to illuminate. In line with this, I analyze twenty selected poems about light, addressing the import of form in relation to content. As I will show, this echoes the spirit of the wave/particle debate about the nature of light—a debate that remains contentious, as does the debate about the origins, shape, and future of our universe. In grappling with the significance of Einstein’s ideas by means of literature, I hope to show that poetry can be an important source of insight. This is especially true at the point where we seem to have reached the very limits of science.
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What I Learned from Ranulph A Grateful T

What I Learned from Ranulph A Grateful T

Figure 5 illustrates the three communicative and cognitive regions of our recognition of the Uncanny valley effect. In Area A (where traditional assertions of more information and increased similarity produce higher acceptance) ambiguity reigns -- the particularities of meaning are not yet distinct. Only by creating and re-affirming such distinctions do patterns coalesce into defined concepts. The act of drawing these distinctions draws us from Area A to Area B – into the Valley. The definitions and measures we use in Area B (the Valley) are a means of control, and we have both an emotional attachment and reaction to control. By asserting abstract rules, values, etc. we can "fence off" potential conceptual slippages. Mechanically, then, the key to moving from incommensurable stridency (the Valley) to meaningful dialogue is to move the discussion away from the articulated rules and values of Area B - either to the anecdotal evidence of Area A, or the exemplar presentations of Area C.
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What I Learned from MFK Fisher about Liv

What I Learned from MFK Fisher about Liv

greater variety of foods available to most Americans and evened out the year nutritionally, processed goods were also considered modern and stylish at the time. “Frozen vegeta- bles are very good,” Fisher continues. If her suggestions appear wrong-headed in our eyes today, this is actually an indication of how far we have come in terms of affluence and access to food. She also gives recipes for soaps, and mouthwashes, and pre-feminist advice on how to keep your hair clean with a scarf so that you can still “lure the wolf”— the wolf that was now morphing into a man rather than being an image of hunger and dismay.
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Doing History or What I Learned from the

Doing History or What I Learned from the

Bender further suggests that some of the most impressive critical work in the field of eighteenth-century studies has come from scholars with strong allegiances to other periods or regions (such as Jerome Christensen, Nancy Armstrong, Cathy Davidson, Allon White and Peter Stallybrass). Because the eighteenth century was the period of ‘Enlightenment’ and the parameters of academic fields of knowledge derive in large measure from the same period that scholars of the Enlightenment study, we, even more than other period scholars, have a tendency to replicate in our scholarship the epistemological assumptions of our objects of study (p.88). Greg Clingham would appear to agree that there is a serious tendency for eighteenth-century scholarship to repeat the terms of its subject of study. In his introduction to Making history, Clingham notes the problem of policing the boundaries between eighteenth-century historiography and literature. Discussing the advent of ‘pseudohistorical’ documents such as the works of Ossian and of Thomas Chatterton, works that expressly used the concepts of historical authenticity and the vogue for the antique, as themselves helping to create an Enlightenment sense of the historical, Clingham points out that:
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LeveLing the FieLd What I learned from f

LeveLing the FieLd What I learned from f

Once we were all introduced, Dr. Price told us about the course we were beginning. Where orientation had been a kind of lyover of subjects like time management and goal setting, GEN 195 would really get down and dirty with these things. The irst chap- ter of our textbook, Your College Experi- ence, was entitled “Exploring Your Pur- pose for Attending College,” and that’s where we would begin. It seemed strange to me that a credit-bearing col- lege course should be dedicated to tell- ing students why they should go to college, but the entire first-year se- quence turns out to be an almost sur- real riff on the socialization process of higher education, where secondary characteristics of college graduates be- come the actual subjects of the courses. Having read in Your College Experience that graduates have better health out- comes, students could look forward a few weeks down the line to tackling topics like “optimal body weight” and “the rewards of physical itness” in SCI 163: Elements of Health and Wellness. Having discovered that college gradu- ates are more responsible borrowers, students could look forward to FP 120: Essentials of Personal Finance, in which we would come to “recognize the advantages and disadvantages of credit cards.” To call this material “remedial” would imply that such information would usually be considered part of a pre-college curriculum in the irst place. Instead, it is emblematic of the basic confusion of correlation and causation that animates our obsessive drive to increase graduation rates. Because col- lege graduates exhibit a collection of socially beneicial traits, we have come to believe that the development of these traits is college’s primary purpose. Even more dubiously, we have come to believe that merely handing out degrees will disseminate these beneits.
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What Have We Learned from the Substudies (1)

What Have We Learned from the Substudies (1)

As noted in the introduction (Deber 2014), there are a variety of policy goals that can be pursued, among them access, quality (including safety), cost control/cost-effectiveness and customer satisfaction. The accountability models and tools used may focus on various combinations of these. The substudies suggest the importance of clarifying what should

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What Have We Learned From GRB Afterglows

What Have We Learned From GRB Afterglows

A generic afterglow model is based on the assumption of an external shock, which permits specific predictions to be made. The interaction between a relativistic de- bris shell and the surrounding medium, or among various elements of an outflowing wind, has been the subject of many papers, but the basic physics is not understood. Even the essential collisionless shock is largely a matter of speculation, although recent calculations [20] have begun to attack the problem. Still, a few features com- mon to most afterglow models are independent of assumptions as to the mechanism of entropy production. The asymptotic (ν s ≪ ν ≪ ν c ) instantaneous spectrum [4]
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What Have We Learned from the Departures (1)

What Have We Learned from the Departures (1)

Another issue that these women superintendents heard throughout their searches for a position was the requisite qualities needed for the superintendency. All study participants had easily exceeded the minimum qualifications to hold the position, but that did not mean they easily secured their positions. Even with the additional instructional pressures of state accreditation and the escalat ing requirements of No Child Left Behind’s measurement of Adequate Yearly Progress, many of these women found that buildings, budgets and board interests were what got them the superintendency. A number of the women interviewed in the study were kept from an earlier superintendency because of the hiring school board’s belief they did not know about buildings or budgets. The women often felt that they had to go out of their way to get involved in building projects. Throughout their tenure, they were constantly battling the bias that women do not know anything about construction.
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What I Have Learned From

What I Have Learned From

I also have on field experiences that taught me a lot about being an agrarian reform implementor. Going to field you must always prepare and ready. I learned that I should always bring water and slipper whenever I go for a field inspection. I realized how challenging is working on field specially walking around the land with ups and downs slope under the heat of the sun together with the farmers and co-implementers. Even it was tired I was really enjoyed the company of the farmers because while we were walking under the heat of the sun I was able to know about them by sharing their inspiring stories to us as a farmer. I also felt how thankful they are on the efforts we gave to them. I learned to be concerned to the beneficiaries. I pity them whenever the land they till were not able to pass in the valuation of the Landbank of the Philippines and as a result, the land will not be awarded to them. I also felt happy, whenever the land they till, passed the valuation of the LBP because another landless farmer will be a landowner. A dream of a landless farmer to own land was granted.
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What Have We Learned From Decades of CRT

What Have We Learned From Decades of CRT

compatibility from the CRT. Prokosch and Garcia 1 (and the associated MIL-STD-1751A) state that the criterion for thermal stability is a gas yield of less than 4 cm 3 /g for a single material for 22 hours at 120 o C. The gases from energetic materials of interest ordinarily have an average molecular weight of about 36 g/mol, so this represents decomposition of 0.5-1.0% of the sample. This is a reasonable value, and a relatively unstable energetic material such as PETN has no problem passing. PBX 9404, which yields 1.5 to 2.0 cm 3 /g historically, is used as a periodic check standard. This is interesting in itself, since the nitrocellulose in the 9404 is unstable and probably has partially decomposed over the decades. However, it is not clear whether this aging of the standard would lead to more or less gas, since the initial gaseous degradation products are captured by the DPA stabilizer. Clearly this is an issue that needs reconsideration.
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What we have learned from Sofie Extendin

What we have learned from Sofie Extendin

It is difficult to distinguish the cases coming from an annotation error from the cases that are not covered by S YN S EM FTB . Nevertheless, for dependency types having more than 5% of occurrences remaining at the end, we can give some comments. Since comparatives are not dealt with by S YN S EM FTB , the comp dependencies are not rewritten. Punctuation dependencies related to parenthetical expres- sions are not dealt with too. The remaining mod dependen- cies mainly concern nouns modifying nouns or verbs and the remaining mod_rel often correspond to relative clauses in which the head verb is missing. For coordination, it is not rare to find several dep_coord dependencies starting from the same governor, which is an annotation error. dep depen- dency type is underspecified and used in various contexts, which are not all predicted by the FTB annotation guide. Finally, we are interested in the use of Dicovalence in the rewriting of the FTB. The FTB contains 39 104 verbs and the sentences having at least one normal form contain 29 782 verbs. For these sentences, we find 17 542 verbs as- sociated with a Dicovalence entry in the final annotation. It represents 58.9% (17 542 out of 29 782) of the rewritten verbs and 44,9% (17 542 out of 39 104) of all verbs. We have studied the inconsistency cases in a precise way on the 1% of the corpus that is available online. It is composed of 120 sentences and 12 of them lead to no normal form. For 5 of them, Dicovalence does not describe the needed subcategorization frame: "hispaniser" transitive,"acheter" with indirect object and without direct object,"maintenir" with locative complement,"souscrire" in its transitive use and "vendre" in its intransitive use. Other cases correspond to annotation errors.
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